2020 Women’s Chess Championship: Game #6

Ju ½-½ Goryachkina
11th January 2020

Another hard-fought battle in today’s action at the World World Chess Championship in Shanghai, China. It would be the last game in the first leg of the match. Aleksandra Goryachkina must feel satisfied with the status of the match given that she was able to level the score after losing the fourth game. It was her first victory which should give her confidence an added boost.

On the other hand, Ju Wenjun did not impress today and got nothing against the Russian’s Berlin Defense. In fact, black was slightly better throughout the middle and toward the end had a good knight versus bad bishop scenario. This phase of the game lasted 40 moves and while eventually drawn, sent a strong message to Ju. Her young opponent will be tough to beat and is gaining confidence.

Ju had to fight 105 moves in order to make a draw with her young opponent. Isn’t it supposed to be the champion who applies the pressure to the challenger? Perhaps this is part of an overall strategy, but time is running short. Ju may have saved her analysis by playing 1.e4 twice, so we’ll have to see what will happen with her white games. The two have battled for an average of 73 moves per game! Will youth and physical fitness play a factor in the second half?

Video by FIDE

Match Score: Ju 3 – Goryachkina 3

Official Site: https://wwcm2020.fide.com/
Match Regulations: https://handbook.fide.com/ (PDF)
Games (ChessBase): http://live.chessbase.com/watch/FIDE-WWCC-2020
Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2020/01/05/2019-womens-chess-championship-ju-vs-goryachkina/

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

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