Archive for the 'Historic Moments' Category

There are many heroes in Black history, but many have been long forgotten or at least unappreciated. Chess in the times of the Civil War took on a particular significance as it was often perceived as symbol of refinement and erudition. James McCune Smith was such a man of erudition. Born on April 18, 1813, […]

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Theophilus Thompson There are many mysteries in chess history, blank spots that have remained unfilled. One of the largest is the life of Theophilus Augustus Thompson, the talented American problemist of African decent. Jeremy Gaige’s Chess Personalia, the leading source of biographical data on chessists, only provides a single entry for Thompson’s birth, and nothing […]

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Every now and then I would gaze at the sliver of paper on my desk and see the name “Walter Harris” with a telephone number. It had been given to me by Charles Covington who keeps in contact with him. He thought it may be a good idea for me to interview America’s first Black […]

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After a stellar performance at the 2005 African Championships, Stanley Chumfwa shared his impressions of his performance and his prospects for the future with The Chess Drum. He earned a trip to the FIDE World Cup which will start on December 3rd in Elista, Russia. Stanley Chumfwa – ZambiaPhoto by Zambian Chess Federation TCD: First […]

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Alan Dicey vs. Michael Davis at the 2004 U.S. Blind Championship. Davis won the game enroute to a 4-0 performance and his first championship. Michael Davis of New York won the 2004 U.S. Blind Championship among six players scoring a perfect 4-0. The tournament was held in conjunction with the U.S. Open and held on […]

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Colombia, a land of 37 million lying at the northwest region of South America, has long been one of the most active nations in the sport of chess. GM Alonso Zapata is perhaps the most famous player and remains as the country’s top player. However, other players are rising. One such player, among others is […]

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Most large cities in America have some type of a chess tradition. It is interesting to travel to another city and hear about the “local legend,” or the player in town that everyone is in awe of. Granted, on the national stage, this person fails to register so much as a blip on the chess […]

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Chess in the Washington, DC area has a long history… particularly as it relates to the Black community. This fact was highlighted in an essay written by Gregory Kearse, “A Brief History of Black Chess Masters in America.” Charles Covington was mentioned as one of the pioneers of the 60s who followed the path of […]

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When those following chess in the Black chess community worldwide are asked about a famous tournament in Harlem comprising of strong chess players of African descent, they will invariably mention the Wilbert Paige Memorial. However, there was a precedent. Maurice Ashley (right) sent a provocative letter calling for an initiative to “educate, uplift, and unify […]

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Clockwise (L-R) GM Hichem Hamdouchi (Morocco), IM Amon Simutowe (Zambia), IM Ahmed Adly (Egypt) and IM-elect Kenny Solomon (South Africa). The Dawn of a New Beginning The 2004 FIDE World Knockout Championship was a historic event for many reasons. First, it is the next step toward unification; secondly, the tournament featured players from a wider […]

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