2012 World Mind Games (Beijing, China)

Mind Sport Games 2012

The 2012 World Minds Sports Games in progress in Beijing, China. This unique tournament will feature five sports including bridge, go, draughts, xiangqi (Chinese chess) and international chess. This tournament features an number of top players in each of these mind sports competing in different categories. For chess, it will be rapid, blitz and blindfold.

SCHEDULE
Wednesday 12th December 2012 OPENING CEREMONY
Thursday 13th December 2012 Rest Day
Friday 14th December 2012 15:00 – Rounds 1-3 Rapid Chess
Saturday 15th December 2012 15:00 – Rounds 4-7 Rapid Chess
Sunday 16th December 2012 15:00 – Rounds 1-15 Blitz Chess
Monday 17th December 2012 15:00 – Rounds 16-30 Blitz Chess
Tuesday 18th December 2012 15:00 – Rounds 1-4 Blindfold Chess
Wednesday 19th December 2012 15:00 – Rounds 5-7 Blindfold Chess
Thursday 20th December 2012 DEPARTURE

Some of the chess players headlining this event are: Levon Aronian (Armenia), Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan), Sergey Karjakin (Russia), Hikaru Nakamura (USA) and Alexander Morozevich (Russia). For the women Hou Yifan (China), Anna Muzychuk (Slovenia), Koneru Humpy (India), Zhao Xue (China) and Kateryna Lahno (Ukraine).

Hikaru Nakamura (USA), silver; Laurent Fressinet (France) - gold; Alexander Grischuk (Russia) - bronze

Medal winners from Rapid (L-R): Hikaru Nakamura (USA), silver; Laurent Fressinet (France) – gold; Alexander Grischuk (Russia) – bronze. Photo courtesy of https://www.worldmindgames.net/en/photos/.

Results

Men

(Rapid, Blitz, Blindfold)

Women

(Rapid, Blitz, Blindfold) 

Games

Men

(Rapid, Blitz, Blindfold)

Women

(Rapid, Blitz, Blindfold

Coverage

Official: https://www.worldmindgames.net/en/
FIDE: https://sportaccord2012.fide.com/en/main-page

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

29 Comments

  1. RAPID (Medals)

    MEN

    GOLD- Laurent Fressinet (France)
    France

    SILVER- Hikaru Nakamura (USA)
    USA

    BRONZE – Alexander Grischuk (Russia)
    Russia

    WOMEN

    GOLD – Kateryna Lahno (Ukraine)
    Ukraine

    SILVER – Hou Yifan (China)
    China

    BRONZE – Humpy Koneru (India)
    India

    PGN Games (Men, Women)

    1. Draughts is a fascinating mind sport. Once I found out about the Man vs. Machine match with GM Diaga Samb of Senegal, I started doing research. I had heard of former World Champion Baba Sy of Senegal, but only from a vague reference from Charles Covington. I then went on the FMJD discussion board and started discussing African players and everyone was so helpful… even to a chess person. Now I am interested in GM Jean-Marc Djofang of Cameroon, the African Champion. He is about #32 in the world and not the top-rated African player, but is considered an elite player and Africa’s best.

      GM Jean-Marc Djofang breaking a simul record in 2008.

      GM Jean-Marc Djofang (Cameroon)

      GM Jean-Marc Djofang

      GM Jean-Marc Djofang breaking a simul record in 2008.

  2. BLITZ (Medals)

    MEN

    GOLD- Sergey Karjakin (Russia)
    Russia

    SILVER- Hikaru Nakamura (USA)
    USA

    BRONZE – Shahkriyar Mamadyarov (Azerbaijan)
    Azerbaijan

    WOMEN

    GOLD – Alexandra Kosteniuk (Russia)
    Russia

    SILVER – Anna Muzychuk (Slovenia)
    Slovenia

    BRONZE – Elisabeth Paehtz (Germany)
    Germany

    PGN Games (Men, Women)

  3. There have been a number of blunders in the blindfold today. In Mamedyarov-Aronian, white puts a rook enprise. In Humpy-Kosteniuk, black put a bishop on c1 as if to trade bishops, but the white bishop was on b2 already. White simply played Rxc1. In Zatonskih-Stefanova, black left a rook hanging.

    Maybe they should chose another discipline like Fischer 960. I believe the quality would be much better. Blindfold is so difficult after having played so many rounds of chess (i.e., rapid and blitz)

    Blindfold (Day #1)

    Report: https://sportaccord2012.fide.com/en/main-page/1-news-en/200-report-of-the-day-1-of-blindfold

    Photos: https://sportaccord2012.fide.com/images/stories/gallery/Day%205%20blindfold/index.html

  4. I was watching the draughts match between Chizov and Schwarzman and the commentators made a comment about a combination which would have given Schwarzman a winning position. They were referring to 41…22-27! instead of the blunder 41…21-27? Both of these players are former World Champions and Schwarzman was also a champion in 8×8 form of draughts. Apparently, he shouldn’t have missed it.

    To be honest, I couldn’t see the combination, but this description was given…

    So let’s see this miracle combination that managed to stay undiscovered by two world champions.

    In the board position, black (Schwarzman) could have decided the match in his advantage by playing: 40… 22-27 41. 31×11 2-7 42. 11×2 9-14 43. 2×19 14×43. Basically, this combination does nothing more than transporting piece 31 to square 19 and placing a black piece on square 14 in order to be able to conclude the game with a ‘flyover’ towards king. The resulting endgame is one big mess for white who would have done best to just capitulate after the flyover. Maybe a bit hidden, but not a combination of worldclass. Sometimes, even the gods are only human.

    I see it now! 🙂

  5. BLINDFOLD (Medals)

    MEN

    GOLD- Levon Aronian (Armenia)
    Armenia

    SILVER- Hikaru Nakamura (USA)
    USA

    BRONZE – Shahkriyar Mamadyarov (Azerbaijan)
    Azerbaijan

    WOMEN

    GOLD – Hou Yifan (China)
    China

    SILVER – Viktorija Cmilyte (Lithuania)
    Lithuania

    BRONZE – Anna Zatonskih (USA)
    USA

    PGN Games (Men, Women)

    1. Beautiful combination in the draughts at 03:29:38 by Matrena Nogovitsyna of Russia!

      Matrena Nogovitsyna-Viktoriya Motrichko... Motrichko in the board position had just played  39... 23-28?in order to defend her advanced piece on square 27. But Nogovitsyna responded with a nasty and winning combination: 40. 38-33! 28x48 41. 26-21 27x16 42. 31-26 48x31 43. 36x29!

      With the women, Matrena Nogovitsyna beat Viktoriya Motrichko from Ukraine in the Lehman – Georgiev tie-break from a seemingly passive position. Motrichko in the board position had just played 39… 23-28?in order to defend her advanced piece on square 27. But Nogovitsyna responded with a nasty and winning combination: 40. 38-33! 28×48 41. 26-21 27×16 42. 31-26 48×31 43. 36×29!

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