Kasparov bolts Russia!

Former World Champion and current opposition activist Garry Kasparov announced in an hour-long press conference that he will not return to Russia under the current Vladimir Putin’s administration. This announcement was made in Geneva, Switzerland where Kasparov was receiving a human rights award. Despite being at odds with his government, Kasparov had this to say:

Russia is and will always be my country. I am still traveling on a Russian passport, and though I was born in the USSR, and have spent most of my adult life traveling constantly, Russia is my home even when I am not able to be there. I refuse to allow Putin and his gang define Russia. They are a temporary disease that the Russian immune system will soon fight off.

Kasparov maintains residences in New Jersey, USA and Paris, France and states that he will publicize this issue in the U.S. and European channels. This controversy has become acute during the trial of 12 anti-Putin protesters. As a result, Kasparov feared that he would become the subject of an increasingly aggressive crack-down on opposition. Last August, Kasparov was forcibly taken into custody for partaking in a protest for the Pussy Riot trial.

Here is the press conference held at the United Nation’s office is Geneva.

3 Comments

  1. Garry Kasparov’s statement released on Facebook, 6 June 2013.

    One simple question at a Geneva press conference has set off a firestorm of conjecture about my not returning Russia, so I want to set the story straight myself! Russia is and will always be my country. I am still traveling on a Russian passport, and though I was born in the USSR, and have spent most of my adult life traveling constantly, Russia is my home even when I am not able to be there. I refuse to allow Putin and his gang define Russia. They are a temporary disease that the Russian immune system will soon fight off.

    I am doing everything I can to help win that fight. Before I retired from chess I represented Russia fighting battles on the chessboard around the world. I have spent years marching in the streets against Putin, speaking at rallies, and facing the police. Today I am still representing Russia and fighting harder than ever in America and Europe to bring international sanctions against the criminals and thugs in the Kremlin. I have had hundreds of meetings and appearances to promote such legislation, and the US has adopted the Magnitsky Act and Europe is increasingly open to doing the same. Such laws attack Putin’s power at its foundation: the loyalty of his gang that is based on the protection he provides so they can enjoy their stolen riches abroad. Putin is at the center of the web, but the fight for human rights is a global one and it is critical to both assist and to seek assistance from allies abroad.

    Meanwhile, Putin is cracking down harder than ever and is showing he is willing to create a new generation of political prisoners unseen since the days of Stalin. I have already been “invited” to speak to prosecutors and such invitations have a way, at a minimum, of limiting ones freedom of movement. Adding another victim to the regime’s list will not do much good. I will not casually put myself at the mercy of the investigative office of Alexander Bastrykin, who deserves to be the top Russian official on the Magnitsky List himself!

    Please, let no one doubt my commitment to the cause of a free and strong Russia, or doubt for one moment that I am working constantly to achieve that goal. I have dedicated my life to my human rights activities and my education programs and it is impossible to imagine I would be allowed to continue this work inside Russia today. Many of my friends in the opposition are risking their lives and their security every day and they deserve the full attention and protection of the global community and bringing this support is part of my efforts. I am present; I am in touch on a daily basis with what is happening with the opposition, and I will do whatever I can to support my colleagues and my compatriots until Putin and his cronies are gone for good.

  2. Videos of Kasparov’s Beating
    (Friday, 17 August 2012)

    Starting at 0:50, Kasparov’s interview was interrupted by a police unit and he was hustled away into a waiting police bus. A massive struggle ensued as Kasparov kept asking why he was being arrested. He fell, but was crammed on the bus.

    At 1:40-2:05 of this video, Kasparov leaped from the bus, was caught and subdued again. At some point, he was wrestled to the ground and restrained as one officer was braced on top of him with Kasparov screaming in agony.

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