Drum Classics #2

Photo 1

Blitz Battle in New York!
A blitz match and several “Drum Majors” (Black Masters) watching attentively.
Four are IMs. Do you know them? Photo by Daaim Shabazz.

Photo 2

Drum Classics #2

Who got next?

Another blitz session with a nice crowd. The player on the right is Steven Kawuma of Uganda. Ignatius Njobvu of Botswana has the cap on. Chess players from Africa will recognize others… including the person in the foreground who was making everyone laugh. By the way, who is the brother with the dreadlocks?? Photo by Daaim Shabazz.

Photo 3

Legendary Match-up in Spain!

Most people visiting this site will certainly know the player on the right. Who is he playing? Photo by Photo from calviafestival.com.

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

8 Comments

  1. The four IM’s are
    Watu Kobese, Michael Schiefler(not correct spelling), Stephen Muhammad, and Kenny Solomon. I believe.

  2. Man… you guys are pretty good. 😛

    GM Hichem Hamdouchi is right. He’s actually from Morocco and has been Africa’s top-rated player for a long time… having passed 2600 several times. However, Egyptian duo of GM Ahmed Adly and GM Bassem Amin will certainly pass him. He is based in France along with two other North African Grandmasters, Slim Bouaziz (Tunisia) and Slim Belkhodja (Algeria). I met Hamdouchi briefly in Turin, Italy for the 2006 Olympiad. Very humble person. In this picture, he got the better of IM Emory Tate.

    Hamdouchi,H (2582) – Tate,E (2413) [B40]
    III Calvia International Open Calvia (2.6), 21.10.2006

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.e5 Nd5 7.Bd2 Nxc3 8.bxc3 Be7 9.Qg4 g6 10.Bd3 d6 11.Bh6 dxe5 12.Bg7 Bf6 13.Bb5+ Bd7 14.Bxd7+ Nxd7 15.Bxh8 Bxh8 16.Nb5 Nc5 17.Rd1 Qe7 18.Qh3 Kf8 19.0-0 Kg8 20.Qe3 b6 21.Rd2 Bf6 22.Qe2 Bg5 23.Rdd1 e4 24.Nd4 Rf8 25.Qc4 Qb7 26.Nb3 e3 27.Nxc5 exf2+ 28.Kh1 Qc6 29.Qd4 Qxc5 30.Qxc5 bxc5 31.Rxf2 Rb8 32.g3 Rb7 33.Rd6 Be7 34.Rc6 h5 35.Kg2 Kg7 36.a4 Rd7 37.a5 e5 38.Re2 f6 39.Kf2 Kf7 40.Ke1 Bd6 41.Rd2 Ke6 42.c4 f5 43.Rd5 Ke7 44.Kf2 e4 45.Ke2 h4 46.gxh4 f4 47.h5 f3+ 48.Kf2 gxh5 49.Rxh5 Bf4 50.Rh7+ Kd8 51.Rxd7+ Kxd7 52.Rxc5 Bxh2 53.Rh5 Bc7 54.Ke3 Kc6 55.Rf5 Bg3 56.Kxe4 f2 57.Kd3 Kd6 58.Ke2 Kc6 59.Kf1 Kb7 60.Rf6 Be5 61.a6+ Kc7 62.Rxf2 Kb6 63.Rf5 Bc3 64.Rb5+ Kxa6 65.Ke2 Bd2 66.Kd3 1-0

  3. Last time I seen Tate was back when we played in the Arm Forces Championship in 1988. Good to see him still playin. Those were the good old days in DC! He is one of the best players I have meet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button