2013 World Cup: Round #3

2013 World Chess Cup
August 10th-September 3rd, 2013 (Tromso, Norway)
Match Scores (Round #3)
Bracket 1
1 Aronian, L
ARM
½-1½
Tomashevsky, E
RUS
2 Morozevich, A
RUS
4½-3½
Vitiugov, N
RUS
Bracket 2
3 Kamsky, G
USA
1½-½
Hammer, J
NOR
4 Mamedyarov, S
AZE
2½-1½
Wei Yi
CHN
Bracket 3
5 Grischuk, A
RUS
1½-2½
Le Quang Liem
VIE
6 Svidler, P
RUS
1½-½
Radjabov, T
AZE
Bracket 4
7 Karjakin, S
RUS
4½-3½
Eljanov, P
UKR
8 Dreev, A
RUS
2-4
Andreikin, D
RUS
Bracket 5
9 Caruana, F
ITA
3-1
Malakhov, V
RUS
10 Giri, A
NED
1½-2½
Granda Zuniga, J
PER
Bracket 6
11 Gelfand, B
ISR
1½-½
Moiseenko, A
UKR
12 Dominguez Perez, L
CUB
½-1½
Vachier-Lagrave, M
FRA
Bracket 7
13 Kramnik, V
RUS
3-1
Areshchenko, A
UKR
14 Ivanchuk, V
UKR
3-1
Kryvoruchko, Y
UKR
Bracket 8
15 Nakamura, H
USA
2-0
Adhiban, B
IND
16 Korobov, A
UKR
2½-1½
Dubov, D
RUS
Drum Coverage
| Round 1 | Round 2 | Round 3 | Round 4 | Round 5 |
| Semifinals | Finals |

Official Website: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/
Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/
All PGN Games (TWIC): https://www.theweekinchess.com/
Rules and Regulations: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

13 Comments

  1. Round #3 – Game #1
    Saturday, 17 August 2013

    Aronian, Grischuk pushed to the brink…
    half of today’s games were decisive!

    2013 World Chess Cup
    August 10th-September 3rd, 2013 (Tromso, Norway)
    Game Scores (Round #3, Game #1)
    1 Aronian, L
    ARM
    0-1
    Tomashevsky, E
    RUS
    2 Vitiugov, N
    RUS
    ½-½
    Morozevich, A
    RUS
    3 Hammer, J
    NOR
    0-1
    Kamsky, G
    USA
    4 Mamedyarov, S
    AZE
    ½-½
    Wei Yi
    CHN
    5 Le Quang Liem
    VIE
    1-0
    Grischuk, A
    RUS
    6 Svidler, P
    RUS
    1-0
    Radjabov, T
    AZE
    7 Karjakin, S
    RUS
    ½-½
    Eljanov, P
    UKR
    8 Andreikin, D
    RUS
    ½-½
    Dreev, A
    RUS
    9 Caruana, F
    ITA
    ½-½
    Malakhov, V
    RUS
    10 Granda Zuniga, J
    PER
    0-1
    Giri, A
    NED
    11 Gelfand, B
    ISR
    1-0
    Moiseenko, A
    UKR
    12 Vachier-Lagrave, M
    FRA
    1-0
    Dominguez Perez, L
    CUB
    13 Kramnik, V
    RUS
    ½-½
    Areshchenko, A
    UKR
    14 Ivanchuk, V
    UKR
    ½-½
    Kryvoruchko, Y
    UKR
    15 Adhiban, B
    IND
    0-1
    Nakamura, H
    USA
    16 Dubov, D
    RUS
    ½-½
    Korobov, A
    UKR
    PGN Games (Round 3.1)

    Le Quang Liem on the verge of
    toppling a favorite. Photo by Paul Truong.

    No one said it would be easy, but many have picked Levon Aronian to vie for one of the first two spots. He may qualify after all, but he is at the brink of elimination in the World Cup. Battling the ill effects of a nasty cold, Aronian was outplayed by Evgeny Tomoshevsky’s Stonewall Dutch, a rare line played at top level.

    In the middlegame, white’s position was shredded and black was able to pick off a healthy pawn and nursed it to victory. In the final position, Aronian was losing a piece. Alexander Grischuk went down against Le Quang Liem after going astray in the ending. At a critical moment, the Russian traded queens into a lost pawn ending. It is a painful loss for Grischuk who will have to press to level the score against the solid player from Vietnam. It will be a tough challenge.

    Hikaru Nakamura showed exactly how to beat a player whose inexperience as this level showed a bit. Baskaran Adibhan upset Evgeny Alekseev and Alexandr Fier and was the big underdog again. Peter Svidler, who in the commentary room, was watching this game and declared that Adhiban did not play to his tactical strengths. Svidler recalled being brutally mated in a blitz battle against the quick-moving Indian.

    Nakamura found a novel way to end the game after 38.Rd4!

    Svidler feels he stands a better chance if he plays more daring. He decided to play the Exchange Ruy Lopez and got nothing in the opening. He may have studied Nakamura-Ivanchuk (London 2012), but perhaps was trying to improve with 9.Be3 instead of 9. Nc3. The game perhaps went according to plan, but Nakamura had two bishop exerting pressure in the center. He finally white’s backward pawn and in the end found an imaginative way to win material with 38…Rd4! 39.Nb1 Be5! An exchange down and in zugzwang, white resigned. Thus far, Nakamura has been one of the more consistent players. He has yet to require a tiebreak. This may be helpful as he advances.

    Boris Gelfand also had a smooth win against Alexander Moiseenko in what turned out to be a positional squeeze. In what was a Ragozin QGD, Black never equalized and his pieces were pushed into odd places (Nd8, Qe7, Bd6). Black never had a chance to untangle his pieces. Gelfand turned the screws and got a tremendous bind. Ultimately, black had to donate material to keep the fight going. However, two minor pieces and passed pawn were too much for the lone rook.

    Anish Giri certainly dodged a bullet against Julio Granda Zuniga.
    Photo by Paul Truong.

    What would this tournament be without its share of blunders. The “blunder bug” bit both Julio Granda and Jon Ludwig Hammer. Actually Granda was on the verge on winning against Anish Giri! After outplaying the young star the entire game, he made an oversight that lost a piece. Instead of 54.axb5, he should play 54.Qh8+ and then 55.axb5. Tough loss for the Peruvian legend and a relieved Giri knew he had dodged a bullet.

    Hammar’s natty jacket may have been the inspiration of his creativity at the board, the Kamsky was cool as a cucumber and calmly punished his opponent’s aggression. Photo by Paul Truong.

    Lots of puns were been offered in online fora such as “Hammer Time”. However, for the young Norwegian he was the one who was hammered. He may have a lot of confidence after beating David Navara, but his sacrificial attack against the Sphinx-like Gata Kamsky fell flat. Hammer sacrificed an exchange, then a piece, then another piece. He appeared to be playing blitz in the tiebreak. Kamsky calmly refuted the attack and after a horrible game against Shiminov, Kamsky seems to have rebounded.

    Peter Svidler and Maxime Vachier-Lagrave won against Teimour Radjabov and Leinier Dominguez, respectively. The latter game has a nice sacrificial motif commonly seen in the Najdorf with 14.Bd5!?

    Games

    Official Website: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/
    Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2013/08/09/2013-world-chess-cup-tromso-norway/
    All PGN Games (TWIC): https://www.theweekinchess.com/assets/files/pgn/wcup13.pgn
    Rules and Regulations: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/official-info/rules-and-regulations

  2. Round #3 – Game 2
    Sunday, 18 August 2013

    Aronian ousted, Grischuk staved off elimination…
    ten tiebreaks tomorrow!

    Evgeny Tomsahevsky closed the deal on Levon Aronian.
    Photo by Paul Truong.

    2013 World Chess Cup
    August 10th-September 3rd, 2013 (Tromso, Norway)
    Game Scores (Round #3, Game #2)
    1 Tomashevsky, E
    RUS
    ½-½
    Aronian, L
    ARM
    2 Morozevich, A
    RUS
    ½-½
    Vitiugov, N
    RUS
    3 Kamsky, G
    USA
    ½-½
    Hammer, J
    NOR
    4 Wei Yi
    CHN
    ½-½
    Mamedyarov, S
    AZE
    5 Grischuk, A
    RUS
    1-0
    Le Quang Liem
    VIE
    6 Radjabov, T
    AZE
    ½-½
    Svidler, P
    RUS
    7 Eljanov, P
    UKR
    ½-½
    Karjakin, S
    RUS
    8 Dreev, A
    RUS
    ½-½
    Andreikin, D
    RUS
    9 Malakhov, V
    RUS
    ½-½
    Caruana, F
    ITA
    10 Giri, A
    NED
    0-1
    Granda Zuniga, J
    PER
    11 Moiseenko, A
    UKR
    ½-½
    Gelfand, B
    ISR
    12 Dominguez Perez, L
    CUB
    ½-½
    Vachier-Lagrave, M
    FRA
    13 Areshchenko, A
    UKR
    ½-½
    Kramnik, V
    RUS
    14 Kryvoruchko, Y
    UKR
    ½-½
    Ivanchuk, V
    UKR
    15 Nakamura, H
    USA
    1-0
    Adhiban, B
    IND
    16 Korobov, A
    UKR
    ½-½
    Dubov, D
    RUS
    PGN Games (Round 3.2)

    It happened. The tournament’s top-seed was eliminated from tournament contention. Levon Aronian, who has been seen battling a bad cold, tried to equalize against Evgeny Tomashevsky, but fell short and was ousted. Aronian tried the “Snake Benoni” in an attempt to catch the Russian napping. The game certainly became unbalanced and white had an advantage in space.

    Tomashevsky tried capitalizing by sacrificing a piece for an attack. In actuality white’s attack looked dangerous, but he was threatening to draw more than anything else. Aronian could have held onto his material advantage, but erred with 24…gxf5?? and allowed white a free path to attack his king. With black’s pieces offside, there was no stopping white from repeating checks on the open king… and Aronian was sent packing.

    The Peruvian legend uncorked 45…Nbxa5! and after 46. Nxb5 cxb5 47. bxa5 b4! Giri resigned.

    Many of the games were fairly level, thus a total of ten tiebreaks will take place. Several matches included clinching draws such as Kamsky – Hammar, Svidler – Radjabov, Vachier-Lagrave – Dominguez and Gelfand – Moiseenko. Like Tomashevsky – Aronian, all completed victorious 1½-½ match results. Julio Granda Zuniga fought off elimination by outplaying Anish Giri for the second game in a row. The experienced player showed excellent technique with the stunning 45…Nbxa5! Well played! Kasparov, who has been on Twitter posting regular comments, weighed in.

    The truth is Giri has been soundly outplayed in both games.

    Grischuk-Le went 154 moves before the Russian came from the brink of elimination to win an improbable game. Le had won yesterday and only a draw would help him to move on. It was not to be. The problem appeared to be the black was playing not to lose instead of playing actively to draw (see Radjabov-Svidler 🙂 ). Le seemed to have a draw in hand for many moves, but then begin making a rash of errors.

    First he missed 100…d4! which would forced more liquidation. Commentator Lawrence Trent predicted the game would last 158 moves and he was not far off. Le played 100…Kf8 and continued a passive defense which essentially came apart. In a matter of five moves, black was down two pawns and completely losing. There were no drawing methods in this ending and Grischuk showed flawless technique to convert the point.

    Baskaran Adhiban may have lost to Hikaru Nakamura but should win an award for “Mr. Congeniality”. He quickly became a post-game favorite of the fans. He will return to Tromso for the Olympiad next year. Photo by Paul Truong.

    The only whitewash of the round was Hikaru Nakamura’s domination of Baskaran Adhiban. The Indian was simply overmatched and did not have a chance at any point of this match. Today’s game was simply a brilliant effort by the American. The game was a King’s Indian and Nakamura decided to trade queens early and show his techique. A key sequence of the game was 16. Be3 a4 17. dxc6 Nxc6 18. Bd5 Nd4+ 19. Bxd4 Bxd5 20. exd5 exd4 21. Rc5.

    White established a bind by sacrificing the exchange for the strong passed d-pawn. Black was nearly in zugzwang, but tried 31…f6. After 32. Rc6! f5+ 33. Kd4 Rbd8 34. Rxd6 Rxd6 35. Kc5 black played on a few moves before resigning. Nakamura, Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (or “MVL”) and Boris Gelfand are the only players who have not needed tiebreaks thus far. Ironically, both MVL and Gelfand play in the next round.

    Unfortunately for the Russians and Ukrainians, out of 17 competitors at least six of them will be eliminated after the tiebreaks. They are basically cancelling each other out. Could we have a United Nations tournament in two rounds? Time will tell.

    Games

    Official Website: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/
    Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/
    All PGN Games (TWIC): https://www.theweekinchess.com/
    Rules and Regulations: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/

  3. Maybe I should stop being surprised by Aronian losses…

    On a different note, It seems like Gelfand continues to improve in his 40’s. Maybe he’ll peak at 50!

    1. Aronian has been battling a nasty cold, but of course he still had enough strength to win this match. Unfortunate. I hope to see him at the Sinquefield Cup… if I go.

      Korchnoi said that he reached his peak in his 50s.

      1. Ah, Aronian’s not well.

        Korchnoi, I knew he could still play competitive chess as of last year in his 80’s (I think he’s been hit with serious illness as of late). I didn’t know he said he was at his best in his 50’s!

        1. I think that they should change it to best of 3 games instead of best of 2. That way the best player will be going through.

  4. Round #3 – Tiebreaks
    Monday, 19 August 2013

    Down to the “Sweet Sixteen”…
    most of the favorites go through…
    “Grande” Julio Granda continues run of upsets.

    2013 World Chess Cup
    August 10th-September 3rd, 2013 (Tromso, Norway)
    Game Scores (Tiebreaks)
    1 Morozevich, A
    RUS
    3½-2½
    Vitiugov, N
    RUS
    2 Mamedyarov, S
    AZE
    1½-½
    Wei Yi
    CHN
    3 Grischuk, A
    RUS
    ½-1½
    Le Quang Liem
    VIE
    4 Karjakin, S
    RUS
    3½-2½
    Eljanov, P
    UKR
    5 Andreikin, D
    RUS
    3-1
    Dreev, A
    RUS
    6 Caruana, F
    ITA
    2-0
    Malakhov, V
    RUS
    7 Giri, A
    NED
    ½-1½
    Granda Zuniga, J
    PER
    8 Kramnik, V
    RUS
    2-0
    Areshchenko, A
    UKR
    9 Ivanchuk, V
    UKR
    2-0
    Kryvoruchko, Y
    UKR
    10 Korobov, A
    UKR
    1½-½
    Dubov, D
    RUS
    PGN Games (Tiebreaks)

    Boards were set ablaze in today’s tiebreak games in Tromso, Norway. Ten matches were to decide who would move on to the round of sixteen. In the end, most of the favorites would move on, but not without frayed nerves and a rush of adrenaline. None of the games required an Armageddon, but Alexander Morozevich and Sergey Karjakin were able to squeak by in blitz (5-minutes) with the help of a few blunders.

    Tiebreak Blitz Battles!

    There were a number of instructive rook and pawn endings, but some were mishandled. In the final blitz game, Nikita Vitiugov was trying to hold off Morozevich and forgot the drawing technique in a rook ending with two doubled f-pawns. Vitiugov forgot the right drawing technique and after 57.c6?? f2+ wins.

    Caruana-Malakhov (after 56.a8(Q))
    Black to move and mate. Can you find it?

    Alexey Dreev had perhaps the most disappointing tiebreak being up a rook in the second 10-minute tiebreak, but somehow lost to Dmitri Andreikin. Fabiano Caruana also benefited from a blunder in the most improbable way. In his first rapid game against Vladimir Malakhov, he was down a clear rook after pawns promoted. The Russian actually had mate in eight (diagram), but made the wrong series of checks, the king got away and he ultimately got mated himself. Amazing!

    Peruvian Grandmaster Julio Granda Zuniga

    The story of the round still has to be “Grande” Julio Granda who eliminated Anish Giri in what was purely a dominant performance. Granda stated after the game that he feels that he is playing much better than in the previous rounds and he is getting the results. He will now plays Caruana as he continues his “Cinderella” run.

    Games

    Official Website: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/
    Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/
    All PGN Games (TWIC): https://www.theweekinchess.com/
    Rules and Regulations: https://www.chessworldcup2013.com/

  5. Commentator IM Lawrence Trent was commenting on this position. He mentioned that he had discussed this position with Grischuk and black can have pawns on f7, f6, f5, f4 and it is still drawn. However, white’s c-pawn makes a difference.

    In the following position, white can hold, but Vitiugov played 57.c6?? and lost to 57…f2+. The idea would be 57.Kf1! and whenever the black king advanced, the rook would check behind. If the rook tries to build a bridge, the white king moves to f2. Note that 57.Re8+ also draws.

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