World Chess Beat (September 2008)

World Women's Chess Championship

World Women’s Chess Championship (August 28th – September 18th) – Sixty-four players gather in Nalchik, Russia for the Women’s crown. The top seed is Humpy Koneru of India, but she will be challenged by defending champion Xu Yuhua and Hou Yifan both of China and Antoaneta Stefanova of Bulgaria.

Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

Playing venue in Nalchik, Russia

Playing Venue of Women’s World Championship.
Photo by FIDE.

Masters Grand Slam in Bilboa, Spain (September 1st -13th) – Six of the world’s top players will face off in the scenic town of Bilboa for one of the strongest chess events in history. With Viswanthan Anand (India), Vassily Ivanchuk (Ukraine), Magnus Carslen (Norway), Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria), Levon Aronian (Armenia) and Teimour Radjabov (Azerbaijan), the six players tip the scales at 2775 ELO average! The stakes are high as the winning will carry home 400,000 euros or 585,000 U.S. dollars.

Official Site: https://www.bilbaofinalmasters.com/en_index.asp

Radjabov, Aronian, Carlsen, Anand, Ivanchuk, Topalov

The players are: Teimour Radjabov, Levon Aronian, Magnus Carlsen, Viswanathan Anand, Vassily Ivanchuk, Veselin Topalov. Photo by Nadja Woisin.

Miami Chess Open

(September 10th-14th) – The 2nd Miami Open will be held in beautiful south beach and hopes to improve on its successful debut. Taken from the themiamichessopen.com website,

The grandmasters Irina Krush, two times US Women Champion, and Alexander Shabalov, four times US Men Champion, announced recently they will repeat his participation in the Miami Chess Open that will be played September 10-14 in the Magic City.

Some other strong players, as grandmasters Varuzhan Akobian, Viktor Mikhalevsky, Darmen Sadvakasov, Julio Becerra and Gilberto Hernández will also return to play the second edition of this tournament, with USD 100,000 in prizes.

The new faces will be the US grandmasters Alexander Ivanov, and Dmitri Gurevich, and the Mexican Juan Carlos Gonzalez.

Official Site: https://www.themiamichessopen.com/index.htm

29 Comments

  1. In this video, you have some intriguing discussion with some of the women’s top players. Very interesting to hear them speak of chess and offer their unique views. Jilin Zhang of China is very impressive, articulates well and shows that China has more talent coming through the pipeline. IM Anna Muzychuk of Slovenia, GM Hoang Tranh Trang of Hungary and India’s IM Dronavali Harika join the panel.

    In a breaking story a controversy reigned in an Armeggedon match between IM Monika Socko (Poland) and WIM Sabina-Francesca Foisor (Romania). The game ended in a time scramble. The following story was posted at ChessBase.

    The game ends in the time default against Sabina-Francesca Foisor. The relevant section start at 1 min 20 sec in the video below, and after the wild action the position is reduced to king and knight vs king and knight. Foisor signals with a hand shrug (1 min 36 sec on the video) that the game is drawn. But she plays on until her clock run out.

    Black ran out of time. Is it still a draw?

    Watch the video. (Note: The commentary is in Russian, but there is enough English to understand.)

    This is a common dispute in blitz games on whether there is mating material. In general the game is a draw, but the difference here is Foisor allowed her flag to fall. In this game white got six minutes to black’s five, but had to win and black only had to draw to advance. Socko quickly showed Chief Arbiter Zsuzsa Veroci (Hungary) that you can construct a mate in K+N vs. K+N.

    Yes… mate is possible, but how does one force the mate? Here is one way someone pointed out… 1.Nd3 Nb6+ 2.Kb5 Kc7 3.Nc5 Kb8 4.Kc6 Ka8 5.Kc7 Ka7 6.Nd7 Ka8 7.Kd8 Nc8 8.Kc7 Na7 9.Nb6#

    Deputy Chief Arbiter Mikko Markkula (Finland) insisted that such a position can be constructed only with cooperation. Georgios Makropoulos, FIDE Deputy President and Chairman of the Appeals Committee, got involved, but it is unclear what role he played. Socko got on the phone and called respected arbiter Andzhey Filipowicz (Poland). After this it was ruled that Socko indeed was the winner. I would think it was because of Foisor’s time forfeit than anything else.

    Horrible way to lose.

    Round One: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/results/?lang=eng&id=36
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

  2. The second round has begun and the first games have produced a couple of upsets. Defending champion Xu Yuhua lost to Svetlana Matveeva of Russia. She will need to win to keep her hopes for a repeat alive. China’s Zhao Xue lost to her compatriot Shen Yang.

    Hou Yifan is still on track after winning her game against Mongolian Bathuyang Mongontuul. Mongolians have the strongest-sounding names in the world, but she will need all of her strength to knock Hou of her course.

    Round Two: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/results/?lang=eng&id=39
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

    WGM Bathuyang Mongontuul (Mongolia) vs. WGM Hou Yifan (China)

    WGM Bathuyang Mongontuul (Mongolia) vs. WGM Hou Yifan (China)
    Photo © FIDE.com.

  3. It is this type of blitz/speed chess debate that keeps the sport off of television. You have to institute a consistent way to handle controversy across all types of lines.
    The arbiter/tournament director will not necessarily make the same ruling on the same situation in another tournament.

  4. How many points needed for a GM norm in Bilboa? It’s so strong that maybe only need a 1/2-point from 10 games for a norm. 😆

    Actually, for a 10-round norm, it would be 3.5/10. Most mortals would lose all ten games.

  5. After a rest day, the Women’s World Championship with continue tomorrow minus the defending champion, Xu Yuhua. She was bounced from the competition by Russia’s Svetlana Matveeva and will hope that here three compatriots will bring home another title. China has had three World Champions over the past 15 years.

    The “Sweet Sixteen” will be whittled down to eight and I am picking China to send at least two players on. Humpy Koneru needs to be careful against Hoang Thanh Trang because she’s had a long lay off with the bye and the rest day. I’m looking for a few upsets in this round.

    Round Three: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/results/?lang=eng&id=40
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

  6. China’s Hou Yifan keeps on rolling. She crushed Italy’s Elena Sedina and has won every game thus far. She has yet to be tested, but she seems to be playing solid chess these days. Legendary Swedish Grandmaster Pia Cramling and fellow GM Antoaneta Stefanova of Bulgaria have played well. Russia’s Alexandra Kosteniuk was held by her compatriot Tatjana Kosintseva, a rising star. Humpy Koneru doesn’t look that sharp at this point.

  7. The quarterfinals matchups in the Women’s World Championship are set. Two Chinese are through and several pre-tournament favorites are still in the hunt.

    Pairings

    Round 4 Match 01
    Kosteniuk, Aleksandra (RUS, 2510) – Ushenina, Anna (UKR, 2476)

    Round 4 Match 02
    Koneru, Humpy (IND, 2622) – Shen, Yang (CHN, 2445)

    Round 4 Match 03
    Mkrtchian, Lilit (ARM, 2436) – Hou, Yifan (CHN, 2557)

    Round 4 Match 04
    Stefanova, Antoaneta (BUL, 2550) – Cramling, Pia (SWE, 2544)

    null

    Shen Yang (right) ousting Nadezhda Kosinteva.
    Photo © FIDE.com.

  8. Viswanathan Anand gets crushed by Veselin Topalov in 25 moves. I remember Anand got crushed by Garry Kasparov in about 20 moves in an Evans Gambit. This match was highly anticipated and it is possible the two could meet again for the TOTALLY unified championship. The ChessBase report is also claiming that Magnus Carlsen of Norway is #1 of the LIVE rating list. Carlsen beat Teimour Radjabov in a wild Dragon.

    Games: https://www.chessbase.com/news/2008/bilbao/games/bilbao4.htm
    ChessBase: https://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4892

    Anand (right) crashing out against Topalov.
    Photo © Nadja Woisin.

  9. Pia Cramling just played a powerful game against Antoaneta Stefanova. Humpy Koneru crushed Shen Yang with a vicious kingside attack. Hou Yifan drew with Lilit Mkrtchian as did Alexander Kosteniuk with Anna Usehinina.

    Antoaneta Stefanova greets Pia Cramling before contest.

    Antoaneta Stefanova (left) greets Pia Cramling before contest.
    Photo © https://www.chessdom.com.

    Games: https://www.thechessdrum.net/palview4/wwc08-round4-1.htm
    Round Four: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/results/?lang=eng&id=41
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

    Hotel Chaika is where officials and journalists reside. Nice!

    Hotel Chaika is where officials and journalists reside. Nice!
    Photo © https://www.chessdom.com.

  10. I personally don’t think it’s a good thing to champion Magnus Carlsen as the world’s #1 player. It’s an affront to Viswanathan Anand and furthermore, it’s misleading. If this tournament ends and Anand is back on top, it will lead to a lot of confusion. I suppose the chess world is looking for a story.

    https://www.norwaypost.no/cgi-bin/norwaypost/imaker?id=191128

    If FIDE decides to use live ratings then let’s use those, but until then…

  11. The Women’s World Chess Championship has been whittled down to four contestants… all capable winning “the big one.” The pair of matchups will promise excitment and will guarantee and “East vs. West” finale. The semifinal matchups are:

    Koneru, Humpy (IND, 2622) – Hou, Yifan (CHN, 2557)
    Kosteniuk, Aleksandra (RUS, 2510) – Cramling, Pia (SWE, 2544)

    The first matchup is an interesting encounter and Koneru Humpy is trying to complete something that has never been done in quite a long time… if ever. India currently has the World Champion, both Junior Champions (male and female) and only need the Women’s crown to complete a sweep of major titles. Of course China’s Hou Yifan is trying to keep the crown in China and continue the line of domination in women’s chess. Both Hou and Humpy have played each other a number of time and this will prove to be a tough match.

    GM Koneru Humpy

    India’s Koneru Humpy will try to complete total dominance of four major titles by Indians… World Champion and both World Junior (male and female) titles are currently under the Indian flag. Photo by ChessBase.

    Alexandra Kosteniuk is trying to hold her home turf by finally winning the crown. She was a semi-finalist back in 2001 losing to Zhu Chen. She has gone on record as saying she would very much like to win the championship. In doing so, she will have to beat a wily veteran in Pia Cramling who has vast experience and is the type of player that may cause Kosteniuk problems. Cramling ousted former champion Antoaneta Stefanova and has her eye on the crown. Stay tuned!

    Round Five: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/results/?lang=eng&id=42
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

  12. Hou Yifan played impressively against Koneru Humpy as she beat her archrival with a queenside invasion and demolition from the rear. This puts the Indian on the brink of elimination and if Hou wins she will be able to play for the title. Alexandra Kosteniuk played with good energy in her win against veteran Pia Cramling’s French Defense. The Swede fell into a passive position and the Russian bore down on her king and hit her with a tactical parting shot.

    Humpy will be looking for a win but it is hard to see her beating Hou the way she mauled Shen Yang. Hou will play solidly and secure her place in the final. She is playing with good energy. Alexandra Kosteniuk also stands to make it to the final since Cramling will be forced to come out of her positional style to snatch a point. Edge to Hou and Kosteniuk.

    Games: https://www.thechessdrum.net/palview4/wwc08-round5-1.htm
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

    Semifinal Battles in progress! Kosteniuk vs. Cramling... Hou vs. Koneru

    Semifinal Battles in progress! Kosteniuk vs. CramlingHou vs. Koneru
    Photo © FIDE.com.

  13. Kosteniuk advances by holding Cramling in a tough struggle. The Swede played aggressively and built up a strong attacking position. The game reached a climax when pieces clashed but when the smoke cleared, Kosteniuk was able to force a draw by repetition.

    Humpy came roaring back to keep her chances alive by beating Hou Yifan in a surprising finish. The game was exciting and in a tense moment pieces were zipping throughout the board. In a seemingly better position, Hou lost the thread on 32…Nxa5?? and Humpy pounced with a devasting combination. Hou’s king ended up walking into a fatal attack as the black queen was unable to aid the king’s safety. Devastating loss!

    We will see how Hou’s nerves hold up in the tiebreak matches.

    Games: https://www.thechessdrum.net/palview4/wwc08-round5-2.htm
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

  14. The 2008 European Individual Championships are underway in Liverpool with 38 Grandmasters including top seed Michael Adams (2735). There are 138 players from approximately 15 countries throughout Europe.

    The tournament began with a bit of controversy when GM Nigel Short forfeited against Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant when his cell phone gave a warning beep for a depleted battery. While the arbiter was not present Short showed a bit of sportsmanship and informed his opponent of his intention to forfeit the game.

    Chess Drum contributor GM Pontus Carlsson is playing.

    Official Site: https://www.liverpoolchessinternational.co.uk/

  15. Hou Yifan advances! Hou and Humpy split the rapid tiebreak games. Humpy allowed an initiative in the first and allow Hou to convert. In the second game, Hou collapsed in time pressure and ended up getting mated.

    Moving on the 5-minute blitz encounter, Hou won both games to advance to the final against Kosteniuk. The final blitz encounter was blow-for-blow with tactical flourishes in full display. When the smoke cleared Hou built a dominating position with two rooks doubled on the seventh and a poisonous passede-pawn. Humpy had to resign and it ended the quest of India to capture all the major world individual titles at once.

    Games (rapid): https://www.thechessdrum.net/palview4/wwc08-round5-3.htm
    Games (blitz): https://www.thechessdrum.net/palview4/wwc08-round5-4.htm
    Official Site: https://nalchik2008.fide.com/

    Koneru Humpy vs. Hou Yifan in semi-final tiebreak match. Photo © Eugene Atarov.

    Koneru Humpy vs. Hou Yifan in semi-final tiebreak match.
    Photo © Eugene Atarov.

    Coming of age... a future champion, Hou Yifan. Photo © FIDE.com.

    Coming of age… a future champion, Hou Yifan. Photo © FIDE.com.

    Hou Yifan in a press conference. Video by FIDE.

  16. Macauley Peterson, America’s “Chess Journalist of the Year” has produced some very nice videos from the Bilbao Grand Prix tournament. He does the best chess video productions in the business.



  17. The Bilboa tournament is over and Veselin Topalov won tournament ending with a nice effort over Vassily Ivanchuk and thereby throwing the FIDE October ratings up in the air. Viswanathan Anand drew with Magnus Carlsen while Teimour Radjabov crushed Levon Aronian.

    GM Veselin Topalov, Bulgaria

    GM Veselin Topalov (Bulgaria)

    Topalov finished with 6.5/10 and 17 points (win=3 pts, draw=1pt.). Anand came in dead last and surprisingly scored no wins and was on the wrong side of a 25-move loss. Many suspect he is saving his preparation for his match with Vladimir Kramnik. However, this is not a good sign.

    Final Standings: 1st- Veselin Topalov (6.5/9, 17 pts.); 2nd-4th-Magnus Carlsen (5/9, 13 pts.), Levon Aronian (5/9, 13 pts.), Vassily Ivanchuk (5/9, 12 pts.); 5th-Teimour Radjabov (4.5/9, 10 pts.); 6th-Viswanathan Anand (4/9, 8 pts.)

    Games: https://www.bilbaofinalmasters.com/en_resultados.asp
    Official Site: https://www.bilbaofinalmasters.com/en_index.asp

  18. GM-elect Josh Friedel reports that IM Ray Robson is on a perfect 5/5 at the Miami Open. Hurricane Ike deterred a larger field, but there are a handful of GMs and a slew of IMs. Marc Esserman trails with 4.5 and IM John Bartholomew is tied with IM Dionisio Aldama with 4 points.

    The highest GM is Julio Becerra with 3.5 points along with former World Junior Champion Darmen Sadvakasov . IM Andrei Florean has upset GMs Alexander Shabalov and held GMs Becerra, Victor Mikhalevski and Jaan Ehlvest. What a tournament!

    Four rounds remaining.

    Report:https://main.uschess.org/content/view/8714/473/
    Official Site: https://www.themiamichessopen.com/

  19. Fred Lucas had put out some stunning photography from the recent Bilboa tournament won by Veselin Topalov. Lucas is the preeminent chess photographer and I would rate him at the top of the mountain. His lighting tricks are amazing. Pufichek (Diego Garces, https://www.chesspics.com) does good work too, but not as creative. However, his portraits are very nice!

    https://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4915


    GM Teimour Radjabov, the “other” beast from Baku.
    Photo by Fred Lucas. (https://www.fredlucas.eu/)

  20. The China vs. Russia match is in progress with China crushing Russia again so far. The entire Chinese men’s Olympiad team is in full force. Russia is led by Peter Svidler. Of course neither Alexandra Kosteniuk or Hou Yifan are participating having just finished the Women’s World Championship. China stands a strong chance for Olympiad gold this year. Is there any more doubt that China is a chess power?

    https://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4921

    Olympiad Preview: GM Wang Hao vs. GM Dmitri Jakovenko

    Olympiad Preview: GM Wang Hao vs. GM Dmitri Jakovenko

    Here are some nice games:

    Ni Hua (2705) – Svidler,P (2738) [B51]
    5th CHN-RUS Ningpo CHN (2), 19.09.2008

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nc6 4.0-0 Bd7 5.Re1 Nf6 6.c3 a6 7.Ba4 b5 8.Bc2 e5 9.h3 g6 10.d4 Bg7 11.dxc5 dxc5 12.a4 0-0 13.axb5 axb5 14.Rxa8 Qxa8 15.Qd6 c4 16.Bg5 Be6 17.Nxe5 Nxe5 18.Qxe5 Nd7 19.Qg3 b4 20.cxb4 Bxb2 21.Bd2 Rb8 22.f4 f6 23.Kh1 Bd4 24.Bc3 Bxc3 25.Qxc3 Rb7 26.Qd2 Qf8 27.Nc3 Nb6 28.Qd4 Nd7 29.Rb1 g5 30.e5 Rxb4 31.Rxb4 Qxb4 32.f5 fxe5 33.Qd2 Bf7 34.Qxd7 Qxc3 35.Qd8+ Kg7 36.f6+ Kh6 37.Qf8+ Kh5 38.Qxf7+ Kh4 39.Qxh7+ Kg3 40.Qe4 1-0 (See Game)

    Li Chao2 (2590) – Tomashevsky,E (2646) [C91]
    5th CHN-RUS Ningpo CHN (2), 19.09.2008

    1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.0-0 Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 d6 8.c3 0-0 9.d4 Bg4 10.Be3 exd4 11.cxd4 d5 12.e5 Ne4 13.Nc3 Nxc3 14.bxc3 Na5 15.Bc2 Nc4 16.Qd3 g6 17.Bh6 Re8 18.Qe2 a5 19.h3 Be6 20.Bd3 c6 21.Nh2 b4 22.cxb4 axb4 23.Ng4 Ra3 24.Rac1 Qb6 25.Red1 Rea8 26.Bb1 Qd8 27.Rf1 Kh8 28.Ne3 Bg5 29.Bxg5 Qxg5 30.Nc2 Rc3 31.f4 Qg3 32.Nxb4 Rxc1 33.Rxc1 Qxf4 34.Rd1 Rb8 35.Nc2 Bf5 36.Rf1 Qd2 37.Qf3 Qd3 38.Qf4 Nd2 39.Re1 Rxb1 40.Rxb1 Nxb1 41.e6 Bxe6 42.Qe5+ Kg8 43.Qb8+ Kg7 44.Qe5+ Kh6 0-1 (See Game)

    Shen Yang (2445) – Pogonina,N (2469) [A59]
    5th CHN-RUS Ningpo CHN (2), 19.09.2008

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 c5 3.d5 b5 4.cxb5 a6 5.bxa6 g6 6.Nc3 Bxa6 7.e4 Bxf1 8.Kxf1 d6 9.g3 Bg7 10.Kg2 0-0 11.Nf3 Nbd7 12.h3 Ra6 13.Re1 Qa8 14.Re2 Rb8 15.Qc2 Ne8 16.b3 Nc7 17.Bb2 Nb5 18.Nxb5 Rxb5 19.Bxg7 Kxg7 20.Rd1 f6 21.Ne1 Rba5 22.a4 Rb6 23.Nd3 Qb7 24.Qc3 Ra8 25.Rb2 Kg8 26.Rdb1 f5 27.f3 fxe4 28.fxe4 Nf6 29.Qc4 e6 30.dxe6 Nxe4 31.Nf4 Nd2+ 32.Qd5 Nxb1 33.Rxb1 Kg7 34.Kf2 Rxa4 35.Nh5+ Kh8 36.Nf6 Ra2+ 37.Ke3 Qg7 38.Ne4 Ra3 39.Kd3 Rb4 40.Nxc5 Qf6 41.Nd7 Qe7 42.Kc3 Rba4 43.Rf1 Qg7+ 44.Rf6 1-0 (See Game)

    Bu Xiangzhi (2710) – Inarkiev,E (2675) [E63]
    5th CHN-RUS Ningpo CHN (4), 21.09.2008

    1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 0-0 5.Nc3 d6 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.0-0 a6 8.b3 Rb8 9.Nd5 Nh5 10.Bb2 e6 11.Nc3 b5 12.cxb5 axb5 13.Rc1 Bd7 14.Qd2 b4 15.Na4 Na5 16.Qc2 Bxa4 17.bxa4 b3 18.axb3 Nxb3 19.Rb1 Qd7 20.d5 Nc5 21.dxe6 Qxa4 22.Qxa4 Nxa4 23.Bxg7 Kxg7 24.Nd4 Rxb1 25.Rxb1 Kf6 26.Rb3 Nc5 27.Rf3+ Ke7 28.exf7 Nf6 29.Nb5 Ne6 30.Rc3 c5 31.Re3 Ng4 32.Ra3 Rd8 33.Ra7+ Kf6 34.Bh3 h5 35.f3 Ne5 36.Nxd6 Rxd6 37.Bxe6 Kg7 38.Re7 c4 39.Re8 Nxf7 40.Bxc4 Nd8 41.Kf2 Kf6 42.h4 Nc6 43.Rf8+ 1-0 (See Game)

  21. There is an interesting article by Manisha Mohite about Koneru Humpy’s failure to win the women’s title. On one hand it is not fair to criticize, but she was the #1 seed in the tournament. In my observation, she didn’t seem like herself. Her play was tenative and there was something I sensed from the pictures I saw. She seem to have something on her mind. At only 22, she has a bright future, but Hou Yifan is only going to get better and will be gunning for the title in two years.

    Sify (India): https://sify.com/sports/others/fullstory.php?id=14765756

    ChessBase: https://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail.asp?newsid=4922

    GM Koneru Humpy
    Photo by ChessBase.

  22. GM Pentala Harikrishna of India won the SPICE Cup tournament on tiebreaks over three over GMs. All had +2 on 5½-3½. GM Susan Polgar hosted the event at Texas Tech where she runs a chess institute. Her site gave tremendous coverage and it appeared to be a successful event. Indians continue to perform well in the United States.

    Official Coverage: https://www.susanpolgar.blogspot.com/

    Final standings

    # Player Nat Rtng
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
    Pts
    Perf
    1. Harikrishna, Pentala IND 2668
    *
    =
    =
    =
    =
    =
    =
    1
    1
    =
    5.5
    2678
    2. Akobian, Varuzhan USA 2610
    =
    *
    =
    =
    =
    =
    1
    =
    =
    1
    5.5
    2684
    3. Onischuk, Alexander USA 2670
    =
    =
    *
    =
    =
    =
    1
    =
    =
    1
    5.5
    2678
    4. Kritz, Leonid GER 2610
    =
    =
    =
    *
    0
    1
    =
    =
    1
    1
    5.5
    2684
    5. Becerra Rivero, Julio USA 2598
    =
    =
    =
    1
    *
    =
    =
    =
    =
    =
    5
    2649
    6. Mikhalevski, Victor ISR 2592
    =
    =
    =
    0
    =
    *
    0
    1
    1
    =
    4.5
    2606
    7. Perelshteyn, Eugene USA 2555
    =
    0
    0
    =
    =
    1
    *
    =
    0
    1
    4
    2568
    8. Miton, Kamil POL 2580
    0
    =
    =
    =
    =
    0
    =
    *
    1
    0
    3.5
    2528
    9. Kaidanov, Gregory USA 2605
    0
    =
    =
    0
    =
    0
    1
    0
    *
    1
    3.5
    2525
    10. Stefansson, Hannes ISL 2566
    =
    0
    0
    0
    =
    =
    0
    1
    0
    *
    2.5
    2443
  23. There was some recent commentary on the K+N vs. K+N. Since players are required to use a time delay then such a position would yield a draw. If an regular clock is used, then both risk losing on time.

    In the US Chess Federation, if one is claiming a draw, the arbiter would take half the time off and get a time delay clock and make the defending player prove it.

    Socko got a gift in her game , but all Foiser had to do was stop the clock and summon the arbiter for a draw claim.

    Link: https://main.uschess.org/content/view/8759/473/

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