New York Girls making History!

Darrian Robinson. Photo by Michelle Agins.

New Yorkers Medina Parrilla, Darrian Robinson and Rochelle Ballantyne are breaking new ground as they plow throw competition at the U.S. scholastic level. All three are Class “A” players and Parrilla (USCF high – 1992), Robinson (USCF high – 1996) and Ballantyne (USCF high – 1911) are poised to become Experts in the coming months.

This coveted 2000 barrier has been reached by only two females of African descent in the U.S., Colette McGruder and Baraka Shabazz. Shabazz was a 15-year old when she won national acclaim from her successes in open tournaments. Shabazz, raised in Alaska, blazed the trail for the likes of 80s sensation Bernadette Reddick out of Chicago, Texas champion Stephanie Ballom and now the New York trio.

All are young and will certainly set new heights for chess in the community. The next major scholastic event is next week at the Susan Polgar National Open for Girls and Boys on February 13-15. All the best!

Main Site: https://susanpolgar.blogspot.com/2008/10/2009-sp-national-open-for-girls-and.html

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

4 Comments

  1. More domination. Rochelle Ballantyne won the under-16 in the Polgar All-Girls Championship and Anthony Causi took a really nice picture of her.

    Rochelle Ballantyne

    Rochelle Ballantyne
    Photo by Anthony Causi.

    Jasmine Fermin of James Madison, New York won the blitz competition and also teamed with Najeebah Williams of Brooklyn College to win the bughouse competition.

    Speaking of domination, these age tournament continue to be dominated by the children of Asian immigrants. It appears as if the face of chess is changing not only on the international scene, but also here in the U.S. It’s nice to see chess become a bit more universal and reach different communities.

  2. Sweet! thanks Anthony Causi ! Thats a lovely visual but i can hear a Clock ticking in the background ! Its sayin TIC-TIC- TIC TIC. PEACE.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button