World Candidates 2014-2: Blood Boils in Round 2

2014 World Championship Candidates
March 11th-April 1st, 2014 (Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia)
Round #2
#
Name
Flag
Rating
Result
Name
Flag
Rating
2.1 Aronian
2830
1-0
Mamedyarov
2757
2.2 Topalov
2785
½-½
Anand
2773
2.3 Svidler
2758
1-0
Andreikin
2709
2.4 Kramnik
2810
1-0
Karjakin
2766
Games

Blood boils in Khanty-Mansiysk…3/4 games decisive

Peter Svidler gets into the win column.
Photo by FIDE.com.

Today’s round saw fighting play as three games saw a decisive result… all white wins. The only draw (Topalov-Anand) went down to king vs. king! Levon Aronian bounced back from yesterday’s loss to Viswanathan Anand to crush Shakhriyar Mamedyarov with a creative queen trap. Peter Svidler outclassed Dmitri Andreikin in a Kalashnikov Sicilian. In a tactical finale, Svidler grabbed space and then grabbed sacrificed material. He ended affairs with the aesthetically-pleasing 28.Rcc1! Kramnik-Karjakin was a weird opening where black got into serious positional trouble. Black had to jettison a pawn and then watch as white ripped open the queen-castled king with 23.Rxc6!? Andreikin failed to find the best responses and Svidler made short work of the young Russian.

Official Site: https://candidates2014.fide.com/
Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2014/03/13/2014-world-chess-candidates-khanty-mansiysk-rus/

Video Commentary by GM Daniel King

Standings

Viswanathan Anand, 1.5/2 (+1 -0 =1), Peter Svidler, 1.5/2 (+1 -0 =1), Vladimir Kramnik, 1.5/2 (+1 -0 =1), Levon Aronian, 1/2 (+1 -1 =0), Veselin Topalov, 1/2 (+0 -0 =2), Dmitri Andreikin .5/2 (+0 -1 =1), Sergey Karjakin, .5/2 (+0 -1 =1), Shakriyar Mamedyarov, .5/2 (+0 -1 =1)

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

2 Comments

  1. Anand looks like he’s on a mission through 3 rounds. Made Aronian look more than a little silly, showed beautiful technique to easily hold Topalov, then blew Mamedyarov off the board as Black.

    I’m most envious of his draw against Topalov. He was a pawn down for almost the entire game, and castled by hand to boot, yet used much less time and always seemed to have nothing less than full compensation.

    I have practical doubts as to whether Anand can hold up for 14 rounds in this field, but I’m rooting for him. Watching him on camera, he seems to be physically relaxed, at ease and focused – and trimmer, too. Perhaps the loss to Carlsen has motivated him.

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