2012 Jamaica Open

Jamaica Jamaica Jamaica

The Jamaican Chess Federation is promoting a chess extravaganza in the famous tourist haven of Negril! The event will take place at the Negril Escape Resort and Spa. This six-round Swiss will be held on November 17-18, 2012 in three sections… Open, Intermediate and Amateur. It will also be FIDE-rated and serve as a qualifier for the 2013 National Championship.

Find details at Jamaica Chess Federation or Facebook !

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

5 Comments

  1. Hi Daaim,
    It was good to see you in Istanbul after a long while.
    I want to register a trend that I have been noticing for some time in the hope that some explanation will suffice.

    Why is it that at the Chess Olympiads – and I have attent plenty – our brothers and sisiters from the Carribean (Jamaica and Barbados)- from officials to players – never really associate with us from African. I have discuss this behaviour with my friend also in 2010 at Khanty-Mansyisk.Since then I have always made extra effort to engage them but to no avail…
    I will not relent nevertheless

    1. Hi Charles,

      Well… there are many example of interactions that I saw at the Olympiad including friendly jousting between Jamaica and Zimbabwe before their match. Similar interactions between Zambia and Trinidad. I saw other interactions after I interviewed Duane Rowe of Jamaica a number of Kenyans came and we took some photos. There is another picture I remember seeing of Jamaica coming to visit one of the African women’s teams before the round. Of course these players have known each other for a long time and have competed against each other. I’m not sure if it is intentional, but perhaps we should share a deeper connection at these events. I will begin thinking of some ideas. There have been talk about some Internet matches. Maybe this is a way to bridge the gap.

  2. Hi Daaim,
    Thanks for relating those encounters. Hope to see more mingling in the future…The internet idea sounds great.

  3. Daaim,

    I have noted Charles’ remarks. I have tried to meet, fraternize etc. with as many of our African brothers/sisters as time allows when at these great events. Personally, I have spoken to men and women from places such as Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Kenya, Ethiopia, S. Africa and Botswana just to name a few. I have seen my countrymen/women do so as well.

    At the airport on arrival in Turkey, I had some good exchanges with the Nigerians while we were waiting to be processed in immigration. This continued as we stayed at the same hotel and often travelled together on the buses.

    I was singing Bob Marley’s “Zimbabwe” (a pivotal song in that country’s quest for independence) during the Istanbul Olympiad to the delight of Farai, Gwaze et al. I also chatted a couple of times with Jere, Chumfwa and Nase Lungu from Zambia.

    I had some good chats with Mali’s president while in Istanbul and we both lamented the fact that his countrymen were not represented on the chess battlefield. Watu Kobese and I also spoke quite a bit, especially as we stayed at the same hotel. He was particularly pleased with Jamaica’s men’s performance against Slovenia in the first round when we narrowly lost 1.5/2.5.

    It gives me pleasure to seek out these “BREDDRINS” and “SISTRENS” from the land of our forefathers and I know that the other Jamaicans do so as well. We from Jamaica enjoy the interaction. I have also spoken with a couple of persons from Namibia (I think Charles is from that country if my memory serves me correctly) but not for long. In the future, I will ensure that we “make the link” much stronger.

    Just a jab at Eichab….remember as we say in Jamaica that “one han’ cawn clap” (one hand does not clap!). Seek us out as well and let us enjoy the respective cultures!

    Nuff respect from Jamaica!

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