2011 World Cup: Round #1

2011 World Cup
August 26th-September 21st, 2011
(Khanty Mansiysk, Russia)
Round #1
#
Name
Flag
Nation
Result
Name
Flag
Nation
1 Karjakin, S
RUS
2-0
Kaabi, M
TUN
2 Ivanchuk, V
UKR
2-0
Steel, H
RSA
3 Mamedyarov, S
AZE
2-0
Ibrahim, H
EGY
4 Ponomariov, R
UKR
1½-½
Gwaze, R
ZIM
5 Gashimov, V
AZE
2-0
Hansen, E
CAN
6 Grischuk, A
RUS
1½-½
Genba, V
RUS
7 Radjabov, T
AZE
2-0
Perdomo, F
CUB
8 Kamsky, G
USA
2½-1½
Di Berardino, D
BRA
9 Svidler, P
RUS
1½-½
Lima, D
BRA
10 Jakovenko, D
RUS
2-0
Salem, S
UAE
11 Vitiugov, N
RUS
4-2
Bezgodov, A
RUS
12 Almasi, Z
HUN
2-0
El Gindy, E
EGY
13 Vallejo Pons, F
ESP
2½-1½
Cori, J
PER
14 Navara, D
CZE
2-0
Kabanov, N
RUS
15 Vachier-Lagrave, M
FRA
1½-½
Rahman, Z
BAN
16 Dominguez, L
CUB
1½-½
Moradiabadi, E
IRI
17 *Wang Hao
CHN
0F-2F
Ivanov, A
USA
18 Leko, P
HUN
½-1½
Shankland, S
USA
19 Moiseenko, A
UKR
1½-½
Esen, B
TUR
20 Le, Quang L
VIE
1½-½
Megaranto, S
INA
21 Adams, M
ENG
1½-½
Paragua, M
PHI
22 Shirov, A
ESP
1½-½
Leon Hoyos, M
MEX
23 Jobava, B
GEO
2-0
Guliyev, N
AZE
24 Caruana, F
ITA
1½-½
Pridorozhni, A
RUS
25 Nepomniachtchi, I
RUS
2-0
Ortiz, I
CUB
26 Bacrot, E
FRA
4-2
Robson, R
USA
27 Wang Yue
CHN
½-1½
Fier, A
BRA
28 Tomashevsky, E
RUS
2-0
Zhao, Z
AUS
29 Efimenko, Z
UKR
1½-½
Babula, V
CZE
30 Malakhov, V
RUS
1½-2½
Felgaer, R
ARG
31 Sutovsky, E
ISR
2½-1½
Vorobiov, E
RUS
32 Movsesian, S
ARM
2-0
Hou Yifan
CHN
33 Polgar, J
HUN
2-0
Corrales, F
CUB
34 Fressinet, L
FRA
2-0
Jumabayev, R
KAZ
35 Eljanov, P
UKR
1½-2½
Zherebukh, Y
UKR
36 Berkes, F
HUN
1½-½
Mareco, S
ARG
37 Andreikin, D
RUS
1½-½
Kazhgaleyev, M
KAZ
38 Morozevich, A
RUS
3-1
Halkias, S
GRE
39 Zhigalko, S
BLR
0-2
Filippov, A
UZB
40 Riazantsev, A
RUS
1½-½
Bluvshtein, M
CAN
41 Motylev, A
RUS
4-5
Drozdovskij, Y
UKR
42 Wojtaszek, R
POL
2-0
Pashikian, A
ARM
43 Potkin, V
RUS
3½-2½
Shulman, Y
USA
44 Nielsen, P
DEN
5-3
Postny, E
ISR
45 Grachev, B
RUS
1½-½
Romanov, E
RUS
46 Inarkiev, E
RUS
1½-½
Salgado, I
ESP
47 Mamedov, R
AZE
½-1½
Gupta, A
IND
48 Kobalia, M
RUS
1-3
Lysyj, I
RUS
49 Bologan, V
MDA
1½-½
Socko, B
POL
50 Bu Xiangzhi
CHN
2-0
Adly, A
EGY
51 Onischuk, A
USA
1½-½
Ivanisevic, I
SRB
52 Bruzon, L
CUB
3½-2½
Quesada, Y
CUB
53 Yu Yangyi
CHN
0-2
Parligras, M
ROM
54 Korobov, A
UKR
2-0
Zhou Jianchao
CHN
55 Harikrishna, P
IND
1½-½
Rodshtein, M
ISR
56 Li Chao
CHN
½-1½
Nguyen, N
VIE
57 Kasimdzhanov, R
UZB
1½-½
Nisipeanu, L
ROM
58 *Akopian, V
ARM
0F-2F
Negi, P
IND
59 Feller, S
FRA
2½-1½
Iordachescu, V
MDA
60 Timofeev, A
RUS
½-1½
Azarov, S
BLR
61 Ni Hua
CHN
3½-2½
Khairullin, I
RUS
62 Fridman, D
GER
1½-½
Lupulescu, C
ROM
63 Alekseev, E
RUS
2½-1½
Ragger, M
AUT
64 So, W
PHI
2½-1½
Ding Liren
CHN

*The names in red indicates withdrawal. Opponents will receive byes in round #1.

Pairing Tree

Official Site: https://chess.ugrasport.com/
Games: Main Site, PGN (TWIC)
Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2011/08/25/2011-world-cup-khanty-mansiysk-russia/

Daaim Shabazz

Daaim Shabazz is the founder of The Chess Drum, while serving as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds a B.S. Computer Science from Chicago State University, an MBA in Marketing and a Ph.D. in International Affairs & Development, both from Clark Atlanta University. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

13 Comments

  1. Round #1 – Game #1
    Sunday, 28 August 2011

    A few upsets… Shankland outlasts Peter Leko!

    2011 World Cup (Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia)

    The games have begun! The 2011 World Cup started with 126 players at the Ugorian Chess Academy in Khanty-Mansiysk. Two players withdrew due to medical conditions. There were few surprises in the first game as the only upset was Samuel Shankland’s upset win over Peter Leko. Shankland has an interesting story. On the brink of quitting chess, he earned his GM title and has become one of the rising talents in American chess.

    During his post-game interview, Shankland cited his two games against Grigory Kaidanov and Alexander Onischuk as reference games. He blazed through many tactical minefields and mentioned that white may have been slightly better. During the postgame, he impressively displayed all the variations in the critical positions.

    The key moment 55.Bf2?! e4! gave the black knight a dominant position. Shankland stated that his was pleased with his variation 60…Rxa3! instead of the seemingly logical 60…Nxa3. After clearing out the queenside, he only had to corral white’s g-pawn and after 64.g5 Kf5 65.Rb5+ Kg6 66.Be1 b2 white resigned.

    Wesley So versus Ding Liren in round #1. Lazaro Bruzon hidden behind analysis board. https://livegames.fide.com/km2011/round.php.

    In Alexander Fier’s win over the China Wang Yue, the Brazilian was well-prepared and made good use of his advantage in space and scored a technical win. China’s Yu Yangyi, a star in the 2009 World Cup, fell to Romania’s Mircea-Emilean Parligras. Women’s World Champion Hou Yifan fought fiercely in her game against Sergei Movesesian, but made some crucial mistakes and ceded the point. China had quite a tough day with five losses (including Wang Hao’s forfeiture).

    Official Site: https://chess.ugrasport.com/
    Games: ugrasport.com, PGN (TWIC)
    Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2011/08/25/2011-world-cup-khanty-mansiysk-russia/

  2. Pono V Gwaze! I wonder what was going through Gwaze’s mind when he sat down to face the #10 player in the world and 2002-2003 FIDE champion Ponomariov!

      1. Does last time mean 2002 or has been back before now?
        It’s unfortunate that the chessgames database doesn’t have all 9 of the games Gwaze won in Bled in 2002 considering that it put him in the record books. They only have 2 of them: GM Tomi Nyback and IM Andrei Obodchuk. So he also beat current 2700 rated GM Viktor Bologan?

  3. Round #1 – Game #2
    Monday, 29 August 2011

    Match upsets and game upsets highlight 1st round…
    several favorites pushed to tiebreaks

    Games in progress on second day.
    Photos from https://chess.ugrasport.com/.

    Lots of fireworks in today’s games with a couple of big favorites taking an early exit. The talk of the round was China. While the world’s most populous nation (and fastest rising chess power) had big hopes for this tournament, their players crashed and burned as five players exited the tournament.

    Wang Yue was unable to equalize the match against Alexander Fier and Li Chao, Zhou Jinachao, Yu Yangyi and Hou Yifan all lost. Hou had promising positions in both games against Sergei Movesesian and in the second game, she missed a forced mating sequence… twice!!

    In the first diagram, Hou had the sparkling 28.Rxg7! Bxg7 29.Qg5 Ng6 (29…Nf5 30.Rf1 and 31.Rxf5) 30.Qh6! In the second diagram, she missed the same motif. The move 30.Rxg7! works again due to 30… Kxg7 31.h8(Q)+! Kxh8 (31…Rxh8 loses to a strong attack with 32.Qf4) 32.Qh6+ Kg8 33.Rf6!

    These moves are not particularly difficult for her to find normally, but of course the pressure of having to win after the previous letdown may have shaken her confidence a bit. Ironically, the commentators did not see the moves either until someone gave the lines from a chess engine.

    Very disappointing for the Chinese Dragons! Bu Xianghzi brightened the day by advancing after Egypt’s Ahmed Adly fell ill and was rushed to the hospital for emergency treatment. Ni Hua and Ding Liren will play on in the tiebreaks.

    A highly disappointed Peter Leko heading back to Hungary.

    The other big story was Samuel Shankland’s completion of an upset match win over Peter Leko who has to request a draw in a losing position. This is perhaps Shankland’s biggest win of his career. After a period of self-doubt and talks of retirement, things are looking up for the American and he will face 2008 World Junior Champion Abhijeet Gupta in the next round. Gupta also registered an upset over Rauf Mamedov.

    Zimbabawe’s Robert Gwaze versus
    former FIDE Knockout Champion Ruslan Ponomariov.

    Some of the games were finished rather quickly as it appeared that some players were in a hurry to head back home. There were several games that went for hours. Gwaze-Ponomariov saw the Zimbabwean eschewing an early draw and pressing his slight advantage, but to not avail. Gwaze will return to Africa to participate in the All-Africa Games in Mozambique.

    There were quite a number of upsets that pushed the game into tiebreaks including Jorge Cori’s win over Francisco Vallejo Pons and Diego De Berardino’s win over Gata Kamsky. Adams-Paragua was a fantastic fight as the Filipino fought to win with his two bishops versus Adams rook, but could not convert the game and had to concede the match.

    Official Site: https://chess.ugrasport.com/
    Games: ugrasport.com, PGN (TWIC)
    Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2011/08/25/2011-world-cup-khanty-mansiysk-russia/

  4. In the post-game interview, the female commentator’s comments about players coming to these tournaments for a vacation and tourism are far overstated.

    She unknowingly embarrassed David Navara when using his country (Czech Republic) as an example for those countries whose teams did not stand much chance to win and were perhaps there for a “chess holiday”. Navara diplomatically and correctly replied that his team did not struggle for first place and took the event very seriously and came to win, but were not successful.

    She then repeated the comment when Baadur Jobova came to go over his game. She suggested that he offer a draw and that the much weaker opponent should be glad to take because they are drawing a stronger player and are perhaps there for “holiday”. The old “tourist” comments never fail! Players come to fulfill dreams and make history.

  5. Round #1 – Tiebreaks
    Tuesday, 30 August 2011

    More top guns headed home…
    China loses 7/9 players… Russia lose eleven, but top guns move on.

    With some 25 players, Russia is expected to compete deep into the knockout rounds. However, the largest contingent has lost 11 players in the first round with heavyweights Vladimir Malakhov, Alexander Motylev and Mikhail Kobalia being eliminated in tiebreaks.

    The tiebreaks were held with a possible nine games, if needed. The first tiebreak has two games (25 minutes + 10 seconds increment); if the scored remains tied, then two more game at 10 minutes + 10 seconds increment; if the score is still level, the there would be two games of 5 minutes + 3 increment. Finally, an Armageddon game will be the decisive game with white getting 5:4 time odds with three seconds increment (beginning at the 61st move). Black get draw-odds to win. There were a number of matches between fellow countrymen.

    This position proves that the worst blunders happen at the highest level. Malakhov has just played 25.Qd1-c2 hoping for 25…exf3 26.Qxf5 Rxf5 27.gxf3 with chances to fight for a draw. However, the Argentinean simply played 25…e3+ winning the queen.

    Malakhov had perhaps the most unforgettable round of chess when he had to fight for a draw a piece and pawn down in an ending. On the precipice of resignation, Felgaer blundered and allowed Malakhov to get a rarely-seen “super-rook” (which produces a stalemate if captured).

    Perhaps not pleased with his play from the previous game, Malakhov promptly tossed his queen and lost in 25 moves in the second rapid. The loss was bitter for the Malakhov, a 2009 World Cup quarterfinalist. However, Russia has most of its top brass including Sergey Karjakin, the rating favorite.

    The Ukraine also took a hit losing two members of the Olympiad championship team. Pavel Eljanov lost a tough match against fellow Ukrainian Yaroslav Zherebukh. In the first tiebreak, Eljanov got lost in the tactics and his exposed king ended up getting mated. In the second game, Eljanov got a slight advantage, but couldn’t make use of his extra pawn.

    Yaroslav Zherebukh was able to hold on for the draw.
    Photos from https://chess.ugrasport.com/.

    There is a lot to be said about this format. We saw a huge number of blunders in the tiebreaks with several players (besides Malakhov) donating rooks. In his first game, Peter Svidler tossed a rook in a winning position, but still drew. Evgeny Postny also got into the charity business tossing a rook to Peter Heine-Nielsen. The Israeli then missed a clear win in the second after Nielsen was losing a clear piece. With such fast time controls, blunders are inevitable.

    Sending only six players to the World Cup, two Cubans faced off. Unfortunately one had to be eliminated. Lazaro Bruzon, former World Junior Champion prevailed over Yuniesky Quesada. Only Lenier Dominguez and Bruzon remain.

    Gata Kamsky will certainly be tested against Kasimdzhanov.

    Americans also lost two players in the tiebreaks with 16-year old Ray Robson bowing out to Etienne Bacrot. Robson missed a book draw in the first 10-minute tiebreak and was down a game. Going for the equalizer, he tried to repeat his win with a King’s Gambit from the earlier second rapid tiebreak. Bacrot was ready and clinched the match. Yury Shulman finally lost to Vladimir Potkin after making five consecutive draws.

    After an eventful first round, the second round starts tomorrow with interesting matchups. Karjakin will play the talented Wesley So. So is a dangerous opponent for the Russian as he has to be well-prepared or he may be the next upset victim.

    Sergei Movesesian will face Judit Polgar and hopes to play better against his second female competitor. He nearly lost his match to Hou Yifan… in the least, Hou had winning chances in the first tiebreak and missed a brilliant win in the second. (see above) Polgar will not miss these opportunities. Other heavyweight matches are Kamsky-Kasimdzhanov and Vallejo-Pons and Bruzon.

    Official Site: https://chess.ugrasport.com/
    Games: ugrasport.com, PGN (TWIC)
    Drum Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2011/08/25/2011-world-cup-khanty-mansiysk-russia/

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