2010 Women Chess Cup (Antakya, Turkey)

2010 Women's World Chess Championship, Antakya, Turkey

Today starts the Women’s World Championship with most of the top players in the world. Of course, Judit Polgar has eschewed playing in the gender-based tournament, but as the gap closes, there may be more entrants into the upper echelon of chess. Two possibilities are from the Asian continent in India’s Humpy Koneru and China’s Hou Yifan. Both have shown their mettle amongst elite men and are favored to take over the crown from reigning champion, Alexandra Kosteniuk. Kosteniuk has held the title for two years, but has not been in top form lately. She will headline a field of 64 qualifiers from around the world. The winner will win US$60,000.

GM Alexandra Kosteniuk ready to defend title. Photo by wwcxc2010.tsf.org.tr.

GM Alexandra Kosteniuk ready to defend title.
Photo by wwcxc2010.tsf.org.tr.

Time Control

The tournament will be a knockout format with the first five rounds being two games of 40 moves in 90 minutes with a 30-second increment for each move thereafter. There will be two tiebreak games with the entire game player in 25 minutes with 10-second increment per move. Thereafter will be two five-minute games with 10-second increment per move. If the score is level there will be one sudden death playoff with draw odds for black. White will receive five minutes and black will receive four minutes. Black only has to score a draw to win.

2010 Women World Chess Championship
December 2-25, 2010 (Antakya, Turkey)
#
Name
Title
Federation
Flag
Rating
1 Kosteniuk, Alexandra GM Russia
2507
2 Koneru, Humpy GM India
2600
3 Hou, Yifan GM China
2591
4 Kosintseva, Tatiana GM Russia
2581
5 Dzagnidze, Nana GM Georgia
2551
6 Stefanova, Antoaneta GM Bulgaria
2548
7 Muzychuk, Anna IM Ukraine
2530
8 Cramling, Pia GM Sweden
2526
9 Harika, Dronavali IM India
2525
10 Ju, Wenjun WGM China
2524
11 Lahno, Kateryna GM Ukraine
2522
12 Cmilyte, Viktorija GM Lithuania
2514
13 Chiburdanidze, Maia GM Georgia
2502
14 Socko, Monika GM Poland
2495
15 Sebag, Marie GM France
2494
16 Ruan, Lufei WGM China
2480
17 Mkrtchian, Lilit GM Georgia
2479
18 Zatonskih, Anna IM USA
2478
19 Zhu, Chen GM Qatar
2477
20 Zhao, Xue GM China
2474
21 Paehtz, Elisabeth GM Germany
2474
22 Hoang Thanh Trang GM Hungary
2474
23 Pogonina, Natalija GM Russia
2472
24 Danielian, Elina GM Armenia
2466
25 Muzychuk, Mariya GM Ukraine
2462
26 Shen, Yang WGM China
2461
27 Ushenina, Anna IM Ukraine
2460
28 Skripchenko, Almira IM France
2460
29 Dembo, Yelena IM Greece
2454
30 Zhukova, Natalia GM Ukraine
2447
31 Rajlich, Iweta IM Poland
2446
32 Turova, Irina IM Russia
2439
33 Khukhashvili, Sopiko IM Georgia
2430
34 Houska, Jovanka IM England
2421
35 Romanko, Marina IM Russia
2414
36 Munguntuul, Batkhuyag IM Mongolia
2409
37 Foisor, Cristina-Adela IM Romania
2403
38 Huang, Qian WGM China
2402
39 Ovod, Evgenija IM Russia
2387
40 Cori T., Deysi WGM Peru
2384
41 Shadrina, Tatiana WGM Russia
2384
42 Kovanova, Baira WGM Russia
2380
43 Ding, Yixin WGM China
2370
44 Zawadzka, Jolanta WGM Poland
2368
45 Fierro Baquero, Martha IM Ecuador
2363
46 Muminova, Nafisa WIM Uzbekistan
2360
47 Lomineishvili, Maia IM Georgia
2347
48 Zhang, Xiaowen WGM China
2339
49 Baginskaite, Camilla WGM USA
2336
50 Vasilevich, Irina IM Russia
2333
51 Soumya, Swaminathan WGM India
2332
52 Meenakshi Subbaraman GM India
2328
53 Demina, Julia WGM Russia
2323
54 Ozturk, Kubra WIM Turkey
2264
55 Caoili, Arianne WIM Australia
2242
56 Nadig, Kruttika WGM India
2230
57 Yildiz, Betul Cemre WIM Turkey
2225
58 Zuriel, Marisa GM Argentina
2208
59 Aliaga Fernandez, Ingrid GM Peru
2154
60 Kagramanov, Dina WIM Canada
2101
61 Mona, Khaled WGM Egypt
2093
62 Heredia Serrano, Carla WIM Ecuador
2087
63 Greeff, Melissa WGM South Africa
2082
64 Mezioud, Amina WIM Algeria
2029
Drum Coverage

| Round 1 | Round 2 | Round 3 | Round 4 |
| Semifinals | Finals |

Official Site
Games (TWIC)
Photos


Videos by Europe-Echecs.com.

22 Comments

  1. From the French website Nadezhda Kosinteva said she missed two qualifiers. First, while preparing for her final university exams and the second time due to illness. She tried to qualify by rating, but she didn’t make the cutoff. She could have gotten a spot as the President’s choice, but that was given to a Turkish player because they apparently got two spots on the condition that they organize the tournament. Politics never seem to escape chess. She also made the point that old ELO ratings were used to determine the selections by rating.

    Nadezhda Kosintseva: Pour différentes raisons je n’ai pas participé à deux championnats qualificatifs pour le championnat du monde. Pour le premier, avec ma soeur nous devions nous préparer aux examens de fin d’étude à l’université, puis, à Saint Pétersbourg, que Tatiana Kosintseva (2573) de 24 ans a gagné, et alors que je devais le jouer aussi, au dernier moment je suis tombée malade. Nous avons écrit une lettre à notre fédération pour qu’elle sollicite mon admission, en raison de l’augmentation de mon Elo lors des deux dernières années et parce qu’il restait une place disponible. Mais, comme ils me l’ont expliqué, le Elo est pris en compte entre juillet-2008 et janvier-2009 et à ce moment-là j’avais encore un Elo insuffisant. De plus, la nomination d’une joueuse par le président a aussi été donnée à la Fédération turque (qui posséde déjà une place en tant que pays organisateur), qui avait demandé les deux places. Autrement la Turquie ne se serait pas chargée du championnat du monde.

    Source et interview complète sur: https://chess-news.ru/node/367

  2. Round #1

    In the first round of a two-game match, upsets are likely to occur. However, in the Women’s World Chess Championship, there were no major upsets and the top seeds rolled to easy victories. Pogonina-Kovanova was decided in 15 moves apparently a cell phone violation. Defending champion Alexandra Kosteniuk, Koneru Humpy and Hou Yifan all crushed their opponents.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/04/2010-womens-chess-championship-round-1/

    Selected Games

    Hou Yifan (CHN) 1-0 Carla Heredia Serrano (ECU)
    Baira Kovanova (RUS) 1-0 Natalija Pogonina (RUS)
    Tatiana Shadrina (RUS) 0-1 Dronavali Harika (IND)
    Alexandra Kosteniuk (RUS) 1-0 Amina Mezioud (ALG)
    Marie Sebag (FRA) 1-0 Irina Vasilevich (RUS)
    Amina Mezioud (ALG) 0-1 Alexandra Kosteniuk (RUS)
    Zhao Xue (CHN) 1/2-1/2 Martha Fierro (ECU)
    Ruan Lufei (CHN) 1-0 Camila Baginskaite (USA)
    Zhang Xiaowen (CHN) 1-0 Lilit Mkrtchian (ARM)

    Round One Results (MS-Excel)

  3. 2010 Women World Chess Championship
    Round #2 Pairings
    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Kosteniuk 2507
    RUS
    Russia
    Khukhashvili, 2430
    GEO
    Georgia
    2 Koneru 2600
    IND
    India
    Houska 2421
    ENG
    England
    3 Hou 2591
    CHN
    China
    Romanko 2414
    RUS
    Russia
    4 Kosintseva 2581
    RUS
    Russia
    Dembo 2454
    GRE
    Greece
    5 Dzagnidze 2551
    GEO
    Georgia
    Skripchenko 2460
    FRA
    France
    6 Stefanova 2548
    BUL
    Bulgaria
    Huang 2402
    CHN
    China
    7 Muzychuk, A 2462
    SLO
    Slovenia
    Ovod 2387
    RUS
    Russia
    8 Yildiz 2225
    TUR
    Turkey
    Muzychuk, M 2462
    UKR
    Ukraine
    9 Harika 2525
    IND
    India
    Shadrina 2384
    RUS
    Russia
    10 Ju 2524
    CHN
    China
    Kovanova 2380
    RUS
    Russia
    11 Lahno 2522
    UKR
    Ukraine
    Hoang 2473
    HUN
    Hungary
    12 Cmilyte 2514
    LTU
    Lithuania
    Paehtz 2474
    GER
    Germany
    13 Chiburdanidze 2502
    GEO
    Georgia
    Zhao 2474
    CHN
    China
    14 Socko 2495
    POL
    Poland
    Zhu 2477
    QAT
    Qatar
    15 Sebag 2494
    FRA
    France
    Zatonskih 2478
    USA
    USA
    16 Ruan 2480
    CHN
    China
    Amin 2339
    CHN
    China
  4. Round #2 – Game #2

    The Russians destroyed the competition in the 2010 Chess Olympiad in Khanty-Mansiysk going a perfect 11-0. It appeared that they were showing that Russian women are back on track to reclaiming excellence in women’s chess. That goal took a tremendous hit as Natalia Kosintseva was eliminated today by Yelena Dembo.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/08/2010-womens-chess-championship-round-2/#comment-16103

  5. 2010 Women World Chess Championship
    Round #3 Pairings
    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Kosteniuk 2507
    RUS
    Russia
    Ruan 2480
    CHN
    China
    2 Muzychuk,M 2462
    UKR
    Ukraine
    Harika 2525
    IND
    India
    3 Dembo 2454
    GRE
    Greece
    Zhao 2474
    CHN
    China
    4 Skripchenko 2460
    FRA
    France
    Cmilyte 2514
    LTU
    Lithuania
    5 Koneru 2600
    IND
    India
    Zatonskih 2478
    USA
    USA
    6 Muzychuk,A 2462
    SLO
    Slovenia
    Ju 2524
    CHN
    China
    7 Hou 2591
    CHN
    China
    Zhu 2477
    QAT
    Qatar
    8 Huang 2402
    CHN
    China
    Lahno 2522
    UKR
    Ukraine
  6. Round #3 – Game #2
    https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/10/2010-womens-chess-championship-round-3/#comment-16122

    Round #3 – Tiebreak

    The reign has ended for Alexandra Kosteniuk. She made a gallant stand to defend her crown, but was undone by Ruan Lufei, the talented Chinese student who is studying at Carnegie-Mellon University. Kosteniuk did not play well against Ruan whose style seemed to unnerve the champion.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/10/2010-womens-chess-championship-round-3/#comment-16129

  7. 2010 Women World Chess Championship
    Round #4 Pairings
    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Harika 2525
    IND
    India
    Ruan 2480
    CHN
    China
    2 Zhao 2474
    CHN
    China
    Skripchenko 2460
    FRA
    France
    3 Koneru 2600
    IND
    India
    Ju 2524
    CHN
    China
    4 Hou 2591
    CHN
    China
    Lahno 2522
    UKR
    Ukraine

    Preview: Looking at the quarterfinals, you have Koneru Humpy and Hou Yifan in the same bracket. That is unfortunate and probably an oversight. Apparently, Alexandra Kosteniuk is the top seed as World Champion, but it still would not explain Humpy and Hou in the same bracket since they would be #2 and #3. It appears as if Kosteniuk was given the best chance to defend.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/12/2010-womens-chess-championship-round-4/

  8. 2010 Women World Chess Championship
    Round #5 Pairings
    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Ruan 2480
    CHN
    China
    Zhao 2474
    CHN
    China
    2 Koneru 2600
    IND
    India
    Hou 2591
    CHN
    China

    Preview: As if on cue, China has made a statement on the world stage once again. They will boast three of the last four players in the 2010 Women’s World Chess Championship in Antakya, Turkey. This will assure that at least one Chinese will play for the world crown. India will send their best into the semifinals and will try to become the first nation in a long time to hold both the men’s and women’s titles.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/15/2010-womens-chess-championship-round-5/

  9. 2010 Women World Chess Championship
    FINALS (Hou Yifan vs. Ruan Lufei)
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Hou 2591
    CHN
    China
    Ruan 2480
    CHN
    China

    Preview: The stage is set and at the end of this final match, the glory will be China’s once again. However, who will win the Women’s World Championship Chess match? If that question is asked, you may be inclined to reply either “Yes” or “Hou” depending on how you understood the question. Journalists are getting ready with double entrendres seen in the comical YouTube video of George W. Bush asking about Hu Jintao.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/18/2010-womens-chess-championship-finals/

  10. Final – Game #1

    If the first game is an example of what’s to come, we are in for an exciting mini-match. Today’s game entered the “Fantasy” variation of the Caro-Kann, an aggressive way of meeting the solid defense. After 1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 white continues with 3.f3!? a move championed by 19th century master Savielly Tartakower.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/18/2010-womens-chess-championship-finals/#comment-16262

  11. Final – Game #2

    After a tense draw on yesterday, these two settled down at the board to play the second of four games. Today’s game was as exciting as yesterday’s with a Sicilian Scheveningen battle. Hou’s 13…Qb8, but her idea was to attack the queenside. It appears that this plan was a bit dubious after Ruan’s 17.e5! led to a very active position for white.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/18/2010-womens-chess-championship-finals/comment-page-1/#comment-16273

  12. Final – Game #3

    Ruan appeared to be on the verge of equalizing the match with an energetic attempt in the Caro Kann. The game simplified within the first 20 moves and it appeared that black had some chances with the two bishops. However, Ruan decided to give up the bishop pair and play on the queenside. She developed strong initiative with minority attack 26…a4! and eventually invaded queenside.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/18/2010-womens-chess-championship-finals/comment-page-1/#comment-16280

  13. Final – Game #4

    After the ceremonial move, customary handshake, let the game begin! FIDE Vice President and President of Turkey Chess Federation, Ali Nihat Yazici looks on while Chief Arbiter Erdem Uçarku? starts clock. Photo by wwcxc2010.tsf.org.tr.

    This game will go down as a lesson in match play. Hou was leading 2-1 and needed only to hold a draw to win her first championship. Ruan trotted out the hyper aggressive Keres Attack. Hou engaged a bit of bravado with 12…Qh2? This was refuted easily by 13.f4 and with black’s queen entombed, white built up a a strong initiative.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/18/2010-womens-chess-championship-finals/comment-page-1/#comment-16289

  14. Final – Tiebreak

    Ruan and Hou battle in tiebreaks with FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov on hand to crown the new champion.

    Ruan Lufei and Hou Yifan battle in tiebreaks with FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov on hand to crown the new champion.

    If there were any doubts that Hou Yifan would win the women’s crown today, those were quickly dashed after her convincing victory today. Even her opponent Ruan Yifan implied that she had little chance. However, Hou had a point to prove having lost to past champion Alexandra Kosteniuk and rose to the challenge. The tournament was a good one for challenger Ruan Lufei who has a promising career in the sciences after she completes her Ph.D. at Carnegie Mellon.

    Full Coverage: https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2010/12/18/2010-womens-chess-championship-finals/#comment-16294

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