2009 African Individual Championships

LibyaThe 2009 African Individual Championships will be held in Tripoli, Libya between the dates of July 20th-31st. The nine-round Swiss format will be the qualifier for the World Cup Knockout tournament to be held in Khanty Mansiysk, Russia. There are six slots awarded to the top finishers.

The invitation was sent to all African federations and all titled players are encouraged to participate in the Open event. There is a concurrent event for the women. Visas should be applied for at least one month in advance.

Invitation (PDF format)

Nizar ElHajj
Fax: + 218 -21- 4780495
Fax: + 218 -21- 3408305
E-mail: libyanchessfederation@yahoo.com, elhajnizar@yahoo.com

ADDITIONAL COVERAGE

Maxwell Solomon, Kenny Solomon’s Blog
Jackie Ngubeni, The Chess Academy

169 Comments

  1. Go Africa!
    I here do wish all participants well!
    Alas I see in the regulations that there will be no conditions available to one player per federation as was in the past? The financial outlay also does not seem cheap particularly for the Sub-Sahara players long surjurn to the north!
    Having been involved with raising funds for these players to get to play this event (Which was not easy!), It is pretty obvious that there will sadly be very few participants this turn around. I wonder what the Africa chess leadership will feel when many expected players don’t show up.

    By the way Africa has lost GM. Hicham Hamdouchi to France! Dammit!

  2. The average player requires more than $1000 to play in Libya.Air Fares,Visa Fees,FORCED Hotel ,(remember European championships?)

    https://www.chess.co.uk/twic/doellet07.html
    https://www.chess.co.uk/twic/openeuro03.html

    One cannot help but suspect that high prices in the hotel, offered by the organisers, is the main reason why participants cannot choose hotels.
    and remember anyone who has been to Israel before will simply not be allowed a Visa.
    Jackie I think there is a difference between Nationality and Citizenship in certain cases.I suspect GM Hamdouchi can play as a Moroccan if he was born in Morocco.Thus he would be a Moroco national with French citizenship (a passport to travel on).I am not sure if Morocco accepts dual citizenship.

  3. Darren,

    I stayed at the IBIS in Dresden for the Olympiad tournament and the rooms were adequate as was the buffet. The disaster (I read it after it happened) was squarely on the shoulders of the organizer. Hotels are booked to ensure a reduced rate for its use and to ensure that the players are close to the venue.

    From what I heard, Libya is an excellent venue and the hospitality was first-class. As far as I know, visas shouldn’t be an issue. I doubt if the Israel stamp will be an issue. It will merely invoke questions, just as if an American had traveled to Iran or Cuba. Besides how many Africans (north or south) would have Israeli stamps in their passport?

    As far as I know, no one else bid for the tournament. That becomes a problem as well. Does African forfeit its six slots in the World Cup because no federation has the resources? If Libya has the resources and place a bid, so then they should host it.

  4. The African chess championship is really a farce to say the least. One can not even draw a parallel between it and and an ordinary well organised tournament.

    The issue I am trying to highlight is the huge outlay players have to entertain to participate (2 000 usd!) especially if you are a player from the Sub-Sahara Africa. I had privy discussions with several potential participants to this event this past weekend. They, including the current African champ (Gwaze) were scraping for cash in a regional tourney. Once I informed them about the invitation to Lybia, I saw the distress that followed when I broke down the expense tag. Many shrugged it off as a pass. Has any one realy looked at the invitation regulations?

    The question I have and I know many of us avoid possing is what are the elected officials of the African Chess Union(ACU) doing all along to have such an expensive proposition thown at players? Do we expect to cultivate good chess when we never have good events only to economically bar young and budding prospects in this clandestine manner? How come the very ACU officials will travel lavishly to many meetings annually on FIDE expenditure? Stay in Five star hotels and eat well? What happened to the promise made during the Turin elections?

    Many will be amazed to know that the newest GM of Africa; Simutowe (ZAM) lifted himself on his own bootstrips to put us all on the map of pride by becoming the real/first GM in Sub-Sahara. Not even a dime was thrown his way in a manner of “Organised” or concerted help from the leadership in Zambia, Africa or even FIDE!!!!!

    Now tell me who the hell is going to try and gunner for this GM status which in the ACU continental championship only gives FM’s, IM’s as well as GM’s the “right” to participate. But must buy the right by tucking deep in their empty pockets? This, as if there were others who could play instead? Funny this is reversed when the Northern top players have to travel south!

    I know the day will come when sons and daughters of Africa will showcase their intellectual talent without hindrenses and impediments. That day, Africa will emerge from this chess wilderness to stake her claim alongside world best on an equal footing. An African Magnus or an Africa Karjakin will stand up and shout Viva Africa!

  5. Jackie,

    I’m not sure what the solution is. Did any other federation bid for the African games? I attended the African Continental Meeting and while I was only an observer African federations were represented and discussed these issues. They also have the freedom to blog here and discuss in a forum.

    On your point on conditions for players… it appears that there is no ideal location for all players since Africa is such a large continent. It was in Southern Africa last year. What are your suggestions?

    The real farce to me was Turin’s circus elections. Not because Kirsan did not keep promise on Africa, but FIDE (regardless of who is in power) does not have Africa in its best interest. If you read my article “GENS UNA SUMUS” Are We One Family?” you will understand the problems in Dresden and the problems you and I know well. I don’t believe it would have been any different with different leadership. Africa has to somehow command the respect it deserves.

    Developing federations have to begin taking matters into their own hands. The Caribbean is showing some improvement in organization. How has China and India been able to develop… because of an internal structure and a drive in developing talent. India is also a poor country, but of course they have private sector help from Indian companies. China has the government backing.

  6. There seems to be no solution to the expenses problem unless people push FIDE to provide paid accommodation which is a dream anyway.Raising more than $1000 in countries where incomes are as low as $50 a month is a problem.

    Daaim have you done anything about Chess be it sponsorship or otherwise in Florida or Chicago or indeed sourced scholarships?if so how has been the feedback?

  7. Darren,

    FIDE should not bear the entire expense of accommodating the players. The organization would become financially bankrupt if they had to do that for each zonal. They provide accommodation for the Olympiad, but the federation is still responsible for the airfare. Again… if it costs US$1000 to fly to Libya then someone has to make the sacrifice, or they may as well forget about any chess aspirations.

    If Africa wants GMs, they either bring GMs in or travel abroad. You bring GMs in and you have to give them conditions; you try to arrange for invitations abroad, but you have to come up with airfare. Either way there are expenses. Success comes at a price.

    Now I will agree with you… FIDE is at fault for not assisting African nations to market the sport in a way to capture the attention of sponsors. If chess doesn’t receive exposure in the media then it makes it difficult to ask sponsors to give money in return for the little exposure they’ll get.

    The only fundraising I’ve done has been running campaigns to help young developing players, but nothing on the scale needed for a continental championship. Feedback is always met with skepticism because chess is not being marketed properly. American chess is in a shambles with board members suing each other, so it is no example to follow. The only thing saving the U.S. is the rich amount of young talent coming up now. That is something you can sell to sponsors.

  8. Even here in South Africa the sport is not properly marketed.Azanians do not know about Kobese,Cawdery and Solomon.
    FIDE is really nonexistent in Africa.I once saw Gwaze.A humble yet powerful chessplayer.One of the great tragedies of life is to watch talent going to waste.Please somebody help.Gwaze,Kobese and Simutowe are GM material.

  9. The expense tag is extremely huge, But I agree if Africa want some GM’s it should send players abroad. Wel all know sport in africa is not well established, its a part time activity hence it will not be easy for Africa to fully concentrate on sport like chess as long as is not viewed as something one can depend on.
    The problem is not entirely on FIDE but on each country’s chess federation administration. When a player is in an international event, he is representing that country therefore is government to see up to it like the national football teams, they are mostly sponsored by their government.

  10. The issue regarding expenses is simple and staright forward for me. I am bumping into GM-Elect Simutowe pleasantly regularly around the up-market surburb of Johannesburg (he is taking a well deserved hiatus!). He intimates to me the pouring invitations he is receiving from even organisers he has never heard of before from places he would love to touch bases with. All these passionate invites contain “sweetners” to assuage his trip making them difficult to turn down!

    Given the WWW demand on his appearence, I ask, why would he detour to a place where is sort of “Unwelcoming” looking at the demand in expenditure and personal trouble he must endure? If the Zambian chess federation wants to do his duty for the country the action will speak louder than words. Or let’s just say “Cash is Key”. This arguement is applicable to many chess sacrificial lambs/doyens, the likes of Kobese and Solomon. Not to mention Africa talents like Chumfwa ( Zam) and Stander(RSA). They wisely abundoned the game for a clear career and school respectively. Good on them that they will not then spend hard earned money unwisely.

    What realy pisses me off is that we saw FIDE send a huge delegation to Southern africa costing Thousands in USD. for what? To glorify chess, I was told! Well that was a useless trip that served no purpose iether than a sight seeing experience for those involved (in my opinion). That money could well help aliviate the expenses of what is obviously an important involvement of the underdeveloped continent. Gens una sumus, right? I unequivocally commend FIDE engaging and working damn hard for top chess organising the likes we see rolling out. However i believe nothing is done at the tail-end. At least as promised congress after congress. Daaim, I loved reading your missive “GENS UNA SUMUS”, I wish many in Africa chess leadership take time to learn from it!
    Let me hint you about what now keeps me worried and awake at night cause i care too much about chess! Many players from the southern tip might just be unable to travel due to the high expense tag ( Flight, Accom +Meals = 2 000 USD, add also FIDE entry fee 100 USD). When Amon spoke to me contrasting Free invitations versus the Africa Champs hassle, I immediately impressed upon him how great an achievement it will be if he could be crowned King of the continent at this opportune moment. He simply dismissed this as not important that MUCH to him. So…let’s hope no one offers him Free flight, Free accommodation and meals and an appearence fee, at the same period. Rather let’s hope my efforts as was in Angola BGI, I amuss enough support to make players travel at all cost (No punt intended!) I think you all know what Simutowe’s decision will be don’t you?
    Simple footnote proposal; Fide Africa must NOT expect to receive money in this continents events, be ready to spend. So, don’t ask 100 USD entry fee, give appearence fee!!!!

  11. Hi shabazz is a good news for the African chess federation for organizing the african individaul chess championship (A.I.C). but players from west african countries are having problem of invitation letter for tournaments like this. because the earlier the invitation letter the best time to proceed to embassey for visa application. that is why the continent have seen player from nigerian in the top level african chess headline, Adebayo adeboyega, odion A, Chikwere onyekwere, Bomo kigigha and Bunmi olape. we need tournaments in west african states,
    Fide africa should do something about chess in west africa states.
    we have company like globacom telecomminication in nigeria that can sponsor any kind of chess tournament even the chess olympiad.
    thank u for ur time

  12. Daaim I am sure you do not understand the meaning of sacrifice.For someone to sacrifice there has to be some form of material i.e for you to sacrifice a rook on a Chessboard ,there has to be a rook on the board.You are asking African players to sacrifice ,where is the money in first place??Social security in most of Africa does not exist .If you are not working you simply are expected to starve ,It is not like USA where one can get food stamps etc .There is nothing in first place to sacrifice.How do you sacrifice $1500 when you earn $20 a month ??.
    We all need to find sponsorship for Chess not just sit around and write worthless books and blogs like what most GM’s are doing .They would rather play 3 days for a first prize $200 than seek sponsorship.Its sick as that!!Unless Chess lovers do something this game is dying a natural death.

  13. Darren,

    I’m aware of the economy of African countries and the socioeconomic challenges. You continue to make assumptions. I have also seen many sacrifices in my life including a period when my father was imprisoned (for political reasons) and my mother had to struggle in raising a family by herself and worked the graveyard shift (11pm-7am) to avoid welfare. I later paid my way through school by working two jobs and getting loans. It took tremendous sacrifice because that is what I wanted to do.

    You are talking about starving and we are talking about playing chess. No one is saying someone should starve to play chess although that is nearly what professional players do here in the U.S. If you can’t eat, you obviously shouldn’t focus on playing chess. That is another matter. If you want to play chess at a certain level, you make the sacrifices to do so, or find something else to do.

    Note that I said that sacrifice is needed for any chess aspiration. That is true regardless if one is African, Russian or American. Sacrificing for chess goals is all relative to the overall goals. In Russia, the goal is to produce a World Champion… in an African nation, it may be to produce an IM or GM. Of course, it takes more resources to produce a World Champion, but everything is relative.

    In the U.S., we have one Black grandmaster and maybe a few IMs produced in America. All of this was due to limited finances and these players struggled mightly through individual effort without funding from the federation. The funding is not there so many end up seeing chess as only a hobby and not even a semi-professional endeavor.

    Sacrifice does not only come in terms of finances. One can sacrifice in so many ways. In my experience, there is always the same 1-2 people doing all the organizing in developing federations. We’ve discussed this many times.

  14. You only sacrifice if something is there . e.g you could work because there was a job,it was only a matter of committment.These things do not necessarily exist in Africa.Where does one sacrififice $1500 without even a graveyard shift??You even had welfare choice ,Welfare don’t exist in Africa.It is advisable to look at things objectively than give usual porkies for answers .This tournament is simply beyond reach for majority of players.

  15. Darren,

    Everything is relative and there is no way to compare the economics of the U.S. and Africa as you are doing. I simply told you a family story of sacrifice. If you are of African descent (anywhere in the world), you do know sacrifice.

    No one here is saying that Africans should choose between chess and survival. If the situation is as you’ve suggested, then one simply cannot think of chess at all. Your analogy is extreme and you’ve missed the point.

    I must also remind you that not all Africans are poverty-stricken, sitting around unemployed and in a sorry state. You seem to believe that Africans are a sad lot of people. Africans are a proud people of hope and optimism, not the doomsday that you have portrayed.

    Your only solution is that FIDE will play for accommodation. It is highly improbable that FIDE will become the equivalent of a World Bank. What is your plan other than welfare of FIDE?

    The zonal President can probably come up with a proposal to CACDEC’s Allan Herbert. There are options. African people, regardless of where they are located, have always found a way.

  16. Greetings chessdrummers!!
    I just had a peek at the invitation document and I have to say that it is not economically wise for players from the Southern part of the continent to attend. Simple math, the 1st prize in the women’s section is US$2500 and the damages for participating is more US$2000 which is not very attractive for Southerners who have to travel to Libya via Europe.

  17. Lulafox,

    That is a very strange rationale. Most flights in Africa still go through Europe. Are we suggesting that all tournaments be held in southern Africa (as it has been the last couple of years)? Then what about the northern and western nations? Didn’t players have to travel to southern Africa in the last tournament? You can’t expect countries in the north and west to travel long distances every year because players in the southern region feel it’s too far. It’s not fair.

    In addition, if players want a chance to get into the World Cup or to get norms, then that should be another incentive. I don’t believe zonal tournaments traditionally have large prize funds, so the low prizes should not be a surprise. We then cannot continue to complain that there is only one GM in sub-Saharan Africa if players don’t play in their own Championship. Players may need to secure sponsorships… that is the way many players do it.

  18. I am convinced its easier to “write” on Chess than secure any meaningful sponsorship at least for the majority of people here .

  19. True Darren… but what’s the point?

    The thing is sponsorship is tough for chess, full stop. However, boycotting the tournament is not productive and will only ruin chances for future sponsorship. What is the solution? I’d be the first to admit that FIDE should do more to promote chess in the continent. That would go a long way in lending credibility to chess federations.

  20. Dear ShabaIzz!
    I hope that you can remeber me as well i do. I´m from Angola Chess Federation and we met ourselves in Dresden last year.
    Is there any site or blog to see the games or news of the African Chess Championship in Libya?
    Please write: paispinto@hotmail.com
    Best regards
    Pais Pinto

  21. Shame on African chess organisation, such a big chess event in africa and someone has to search for info all over the web, to no avail. How was Libya selected to host such a big chess event when they are clearly incompentent to where publicity is concerned.

  22. Shame on libya. Why was libya selected to host this event when we all know that they were problems even when they hosted the world Chess championship.

  23. Yes… publicity is a big problem, not just in Africa, but chess in general. Many European and American events have inadequate or non-existent coverage. There is no information infrastructure and they may not have anyone dedicated to coverage of the event… or a webmaster. That is a very labor-intensive task and not easy. However, they should have minimum coverage. I believe Libya was selected because they made the bid and other federations did not. However, in all fairness, we have to find out the details.

    I have put in a request to Nizar ElHajj for reports, photos and games. I’ll check Libyan newspapers.

  24. Many thanks Daaim, please keep us informed.

    You are right, at least there should have been minimum coverage. This is a much bigger chess event compared to South Africa Open and yet we were well up dated during the South african open.

    Well done Chessa!!

  25. “guncha” reported on another thread that in the women’s section there are 16 players and five from Libya. I’m not sure why they expect any different. There is typically more players from the host country.

    Women’s Results: https://chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=4&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    However Amon Simutowe tells me that the open group is very strong. He states that it is possibly the strongest ever with about 20/34 players over 2300 ELO.

  26. “guncha” reported on another thread that in the women’s section there are 16 players and five from Libya. I’m not sure why they expect any different. There is typically more players from the host country.

    Women’s Results: https://chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=4&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    With all due respect, the link was first provided by me, not guncha

    “https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2009/07/22/africans-wracked-by-visa-problems-again/#comment-13281

  27. And why can’t this Nizar El-Hajj (I assume he is in Libya) give us the current ranking?

    By now we would be satisfied with ANTHING.

  28. nevermind,

    You basically supplied a link to a blog that supplies the link you’ve already supplied. 🙂 They seem to have the pairings from round #4 now. I guess I’ll put up the results and standings for the women.

    Thanks!

  29. Round #3 (Women)

    Bo. No. Name Pts. Result Pts. Name No.
    1 6 WIM Alaa el Din Yosra 2 0 – 1 2 WFM Latreche Sabrina 4
    2 5 WIM Solomons Anzel 1½ 1 – 0 2 WCM Beddar Karima 8
    3 1 WGM Mona Khaled 1 1 – 0 1½ WIM Greeff Melissa 2
    4 3 WIM Mezioud Amina 1 1 – 0 1 Al Jahani Marwah 14
    5 15 Elansary Eman 1 1 – 0 1 Elgohary Myada 10
    6 16 Rahal Mawadda 1 ½ – ½ 1 Abdulgader Amira 12
    7 7 WFM Mudongo Boikhutso 0 ½ – ½ 0 WFM Elfelo Khouled 11
    8 13 Al Felo Ekhlas 0 0 – 1 0 Matoussi Amina 9

    Standings

    1st: Sabrina Latreche (ALG), 3-0; 2nd: Anzel Solomons (RSA), 2½-½; 3rd-7th: Karima Beddar (ALG), Yosra Alaa el Din (EGY), Mona Khaled (EGY), Eman Elansary (EGY), Amina Mezioud (ALG), 2-1; 8th-10th: Melissa Greeff (RSA), Amira Abdulgader (LBA), Mawadda Rahal (LBA), 1½-1½; 11th-13th: Marwah Al Jahani (KBA), Myada Elgohary (EGY), Amina Matoussi (TUN), 1-2; 14th-15th: Boikhutso Mudongo (BOT), Khouled Elfelo (LBA), ½-2½; 16th: Ekhlas Al Felo (LBA), 0-3

  30. Full results are not available, but Jackie Ngubeni apparently phoned into Libya and got some results of the South African players. That is more than we have received thus far.

    RESULTS AFTER THREE ROUNDS:

    1-3 : (2,5 Points) : IM. Kenny Solomon, GM. Ahmed Adley & GM. Essam Elgindy

    4-5 : (2,0 Points) : GM. Amon Simutowe, IM. Watu Kobese & GM. Amin Bassem

    GM. Slim Belkhidja is on 1,5 Points and we have no word yet on GM. Aimen Rezouk except to report that IM. Kenny Solomon took advantage of him in pocketing full score!

    Nigeria is represented by one budding player Paul Obiamiwe (Elo 2043), he plies his chess out of London. He is on 0,5 point as in the 3rd round lost to FM. Dr. Deon Solomon (RSA). Deon has no relation to Kenny. It’s a consolation that Paul is in Libya rather than nobody from the great Nigeria at all, at least he is most active according to FIDE games list thus, he may follow GM. Simutowe’s lifting-self-with-own-boot straps attitude, by playing and not waiting for help that will never come. Full marks on determination for this man! He made it through the barriers.

    Source: https://www.chessacademy.co.za/

    Added Notes: Dr. Deon Solomons has an “s” at the end of his name and as stated, no kin to Kenny Solomon. Dr. Paul Obiamiwe was at the World Open and made mention that he was competing in the tournament. Apparently IM Oladapo Adu is not in Libya.

    According to Jackie, Solomon drew with both Kobese and Simutowe while beating GM Aimen Rizouk. Simutowe relayed via e-mail to me that he had won his first game. He stated that officials have access to Internet and will be submitting reports later. God willing!

  31. I checked logging of our players to ICC , and found that they logged a lot of times , and now Just meet4 Mona Khaled on Net ( Yahoo messenger ) , she told me that she did not know the results of Men , and she asked the Chief Arbiter before about results , he replied that only Women Results wil be on Net !
    What I know Only , results of one of my players , Wageih, Kareim African Junior Ch. , He draw against Rezzouk 1st Round and lost to Amin, Bassem 2nd Round and won Algerian rated over 2200 3rd Round and will play against Tunisian over 2300 4th Round
    It is like puzzles to know Men particpants and Results , may be it is not published due to Visa problems !!!!!

  32. 🙂

    Hassan,

    This is turning out to be a conspiracy issue. Why are the men’s results being withheld so long? Nizar ElHajj told me Internet problems, but apparently players are now gaining access without difficulties. The comment to Mona Khaled is quite strange. She asked a direct question and he refused to answer. Why is this such a secret?

    Are there any pictures of the venue? If there are any players visiting The Chess Drum, please blog here and give us details of the events. Take a picture of the charts with your phone and e-mail! If there were Internet problems, the results could still be transmitted. We can remember doing this before the Internet became popular, yes?

    Things are getting stranger. It is interesting that they have found time to post results from the rapid event.

    https://chess-results.com/tnr24000.aspx?lan=1

  33. I just saw this “rapid” results too. I think this is the real thing – results from the men’s championship. I have no idea why the word rapid was thrown in. Is thare even supposed to be a rapid tournament held paralely???

    I belive this is what we have been waiting for, but I wonder why only first two rounds have been submited. Definatelly strange things happening at this championship.

  34. SAopen had new solution for some players to play via Internet so next time no visa you can play via internet !?

  35. On the other look – I don’t think this is the real thing.

    What is this rapid championship? Is there even supposed to be one?

  36. Right… the rapid pairings don’t match given the results I’ve stated above. In fact, some of the players in the open are not in the rapid… GM Aimen Rizouk for example. There is usually a rapid event during the Championships.

  37. Ok, if you say so.

    But this is the first time I hear that rapid competition is held paralel to a continental championship.

  38. The All-African Games has had a similar format with a rapid event, but I believe in the African Championships, the rapid are held after the regular championship. Not sure why they are doing it during the tournament. I didn’t mean to say “during” the tournament. That is where I confused you.

    You may interested in the kind of coverage we were able to get in 2007.

    https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2007/08/31/2007-african-championship-winhoek-namibia/

  39. It is like Abracadabra…… The more you look the lesser you see and understand. There most be something fishy going on!!!!!.

  40. People should simply get over this .Its very normal when you allocate Federation posts to people who don’t care about Chess .This is simply what they do .if any professional players in Africa are reading this ,its simple ,stop whinging and get in there yourselves or you will get abused until your soul cannot take it anymore.

    The solution is simple ,players should run the Federations themselves because nobody else cares about them .Do you honestly think a President of Angolan Chess would care if Aderito Pedro is starving??Ok Azmai and Makro are at least GM.s themselves.Ever wondered why patzers like Omuku,Dabilani and Ncube hang around Chess?? of coz the money and small incentives!!

    I love the Jamaican Federation where the players hold posts themselves like Shane Matthews,Elliot Warren ,nobody pushes them around and decisions are made collectively . Why should people give responsibility to non responsive reptilians to run something their lives depend on??

  41. I got a call from Amin, Bassem ( from a phone central ) now , the tournamnt is 34 Players , Abdel Razik, Khaled leading alone with 3.5 and each of Amin, Bassem – Adly, Ahmed – El Gindy, Essam – Ezat, Mohamed – Abdelnabbi, Imed are 3 points ( I do not know if there is others not from Egypt have 3 points or no ) his voice was not clear .

  42. Bassem won Kobese , and adly draw with Abdelnaby
    It is still so strange, not to submit the tournamnet on Net !!!!

  43. Thanks Hassan!

    Yes… Simutowe also mentioned 34 players. He also said about 20 of them are rated over 2300 and that it may be the strongest African Championship in history.

    Khaled Abdel-Razik is on 3½-½ and a group of Egyptians have 3-1. Looks like each region is helping each other. Egyptians are drawing each other and beating everyone else. The top southern Africans (i.e., Simutowe, Kobese and Solomon) are doing the same. That formula will not last the whole tournament. Too many draws will put too much pressure to win in later rounds.

    IM Frhat Ali, GM Bassem Amin and GM Ahmed Adly face Costa Rica. Adly awaits GM Alejandro Ramirez. Photo by Daaim Shabazz.

    Shown here at the 2008 Olympiad, IM Frhat Ali, GM Bassem Amin and GM Ahmed Adly are three hopefuls at the 2009 African Championships. Photo by Daaim Shabazz.

  44. ROUND #4

    The results have finally come in from Libya and we find that the Egyptians are making a statement by holding the coveted six spots. IM Khaled Abdel-Razik leads the field with 3½-½. Five Egyptians follow with 3-1 and draws seem to be rather high. In the field of 34, there are ten Egyptians, seven Libyans, five Tunisians, four South Africans, three Algerians and one each for Zambia, Botswana, Madagascar, Nigeria and the Ivory Coast.

    GM Bassem Amin facing IM Watu Kobese at the 2009 African Championships.

    GM Bassem Amin facing IM Watu Kobese at the 2009 African Championships.

    In the 4th round, four Egyptians drew each other on the top two boards. Abdel-Razik beat South Africa’s IM Kenny Solomon who had gotten off to a strong start. GM Bassem Amin dispatched the “African Lion” IM Watu Kobese. The “Zambezi Shark” Amon Simutowe was nicked for his third draw and has remarked bout the strength of the tournament. Rizouk, the third-ranked player, is only at +1.

    Results (round #4): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=4&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings (round #4): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #5): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=5&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    In the women’s competition, Anzel Solomons has pulled out into the lead after beating Sabrina Letreche of Algeria. Letreche had won her first three games. Every single game was decisive in round #4 with black winning 6/8 games.

    This field is top-heavy as the bottom are filled with unrated players from host Libya. Egypt brought three players and South Africa and Algeria bought two apiece while Tunisia and Botswana both brought one player. Boikhutso Mudongo of Botswana has had a tough start, but won her 4th game.

    Results (round #4): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=4&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings (round #4): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #5): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=5&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

  45. Miracle happened!!! I can die peacefully now 🙂

    I hope the results will come after each round from now on, and that it isn’t just a one time thing.

  46. Most of Africa’s Grandmasters are present at the Championships. Recent additions such as GM Amon Simutowe (Zambia), GM Aimen Rizouk (Algeria) and GM Essam El-Gindy (Egypt) strengthen the field and provide the African Championship with increasing prestige.

    GM

    GM Amon Simutowe (Zambia)
    Photo by Frederic Friedel.

    GM Ahmed Adly (Egypt) and GM Bassem Amin (Egypt) are the youngest GMs are have fared well in international play. Adly is the reigning World Junior Champion, the first African to win such a high honor. GM Slim Belkhodja (Tunisia) is a veteran of many championships and one of the earliest recipients of the Grandmaster title.

    GM Hichem Hamdouchi (Morocco) and GM Slim Bouaziz (Tunisia) are the first two recipients of the title. Hamdouchi has changed his affiliation to France and has lived and played primarily in Europe. Bouaziz has not played actively for many years. Hopefully the African Championships will uncover new talent!

  47. ROUND #5

    Drawfest on Top Boards!

    In today’s 5th round, the top six boards were drawn in the open section leaving the standings practically the same. Now Egypt holds the top SEVEN slots as Egypt’s IM Walaa Sarwat beat IM Adlane Arab of Algeria. Both GM Amon Simutowe and GM Aimen Rizouk were held once again and failed to gain ground.

    Competition is very stiff as Abdel-Razik still holds the lead by half-point over seven players and another seven are only one point back. The last few rounds will be quite bloody as decisive scores are needed. On the top three boards, the Egyptian GMs may try to pull away from the pack with wins over their less-fancied compatriots. Other key matchups for round #6 are Rizouk vs. Kobese and Njili vs. Simutowe.

    Results (round #5): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=5&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings (round #5): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #6): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=6&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    Boards continue to run red!

    In the women’s competion, WIM Anzel Solomons expanded her lead to a full point with a win over WIM Yosra Alaa el Din. There was only one draw (Khaled vs. Latreche) and all the rest were decisive. This means that the standings can change quickly. There have been only four draws in 40 games!!

    Big matchup tomorrow pits the reigning champion WGM Mona Khaled against the front-runner Solomons. South Africa’s Melissa Greef will attempt to edge closer to the top of the field.

    Results (round #5): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=5&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings (round #5): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #6): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=6&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

  48. Now that “information blockade” has been lifted wouldn’t it deserve a new blog entry? I mean a new article/report instead of doing it inthe comments field?

    By the way, tomorrow is a rest day (so don’t panick if the table doesn’t get updated ;))

  49. Yes… I could do it that way, but in the search engines, this is the page people will find when they look for the results. Last year, I had one long blog entry with 200+ comments. It was fun to see the reaction as the tournament wore on.

    However, I could put an index at the top of the different rounds. Anyone else have an opinion on this? One long blog or separate reports for each round with very few comments.

  50. Hi Daaim
    We correctly should be relieved to see the results from the ubiquitous chess-results site, albeit since only the latter rounds. But in no way should this be a ‘letting of the hook’ of the mishaps on the part of the organisers and ACU. The critisism must remain relentless to such an extent that it should deter and discourage deviant bahaviour in future! It is the only weapon in the hands of ordinary people.
    We should also demand to see the games, because chess like all sports, is about the action. Perhaps chess more so.
    Egypt leading with seven postions after five rounds is embarrassing, I have opined on my site in stinging and revealing detail. Yes! It embarrassing. To all Africa federation led by skullduggerers, despots and ‘thugs’, let this be a lesson. They are denying their talent to shine! I opined further that Zimbabwe would have dominated the leader-board of this event if earlier-on they were blessed with a good chess visionary leader. Because the ‘chess diamonds’ are plentifull in this sad nation! I am sure, because as they had the IM. Mamombe when the tittle was not fashionable, they produced an incredible array of talent long before Gwaze(Sadly he is not defending!). We see amazing sparks of brilliance still sprouting even after e.g. a certain DION in the SA Open 2009! Egypt has long chosen th path of good-chess-governance & hard-work, and it now is paying dividends. Let the numbers speak for themselves 3 GM’s, 24 IM’s, 40 International Arbiters plus many caveats!)
    On how we should relate on this blog, I think a long list is best as it steam-lines comments and gives max reference for late joiners.

  51. Jackie same thing I am talking about,if the Zimbabweans you mention came together the players themselves something would come out.But this wait and let someone lead us attitude gets you nowhere.If they know their potential ,why not organise themselves??Why wait on dreams and hopes that someone will wake you up??Players SHOULD learn to organize themselves and take charge of Federations like I mentioned earlier.

  52. Jackie,

    I would agree. There are some issues here. The lack of photos (which are easier to produce than games) is unacceptable. I received a report from Nizar El-Hajj on today, but of course chess-results has filled the void. It is important that we get some documentation of the event. There has not been a comprehensive report written… only results. That is like looking at the box score of a football match without any commentary.

    Nevertheless, I can assure that the Egyptians will not end with the top seven positions. The rule of probability will discount this occurence. I believe we will see quite a bit of diversity near the top. However, Egypt has certainly supported their players’ aspirations and they continue to be the strongest federation.

    Yes… Zimbabwe has a talented lot of players. You didn’t mention FM Farai Mandizha who is very popular here in the states. He is becoming known more for his blitz skills, but he has put together some good results as well. I remember hearing of the late Aleksander Wojtkiewicz’s amazement of Mandizha’s win over Hikaru Nakamura… “Hikaru lost to him??? But he’s from Africa!!” Those comments are on the way out.

  53. Darren,

    I agree 100%, but players cannot make progress by running the federations. They should manage their own affairs as Simutowe has had to do. I had suggested that he develop a “chess resume” and send it around to both sponsors and organizers. There has to be a more methodical way of doing this in lieu of defunct federations. That is why the ACP was created because FIDE did not handle the interests of the players properly.

    I had even suggested to Nakamura that he may need a business manager since he is now in the top 20 in the world. He says, “maybe.” I have had several lengthy conversations with Nakamura and given the inept and bankrupt organization of the U.S. Chess Federation, he has had to organize and negotiate on his own. Of course, his results are remarkable.

    It appears that many young players are having to do this… except for India and China.

  54. Daaim you cannot easily manage to do it your own way whilst at same time bowing to somebody’s needs. Take for example Ncube ,who does not only sit and do nothing but actually kills Chess in every sense ,in the case of Simutowe.Why would Simutowe bow to a patzer with no playing record ?? Players should run Chess or continue in deep frustration ,simple.

  55. Well… Simutowe realized long ago that he had to take his own initiative. That doesn’t mean that he doesn’t hold the ZCF to it obligations, but he has long been managing his own affairs while fighting for his rights. Again… players running chess would run into all sort of problems including conflicts of interest. You are also assuming that players make good managers. We should know by now that strong players often make horrible organizers.

    For example, take Garry Kasparov’s several failed projects. He ruined kasparovchess.com and of course his ACP organization was a failure that split the chess world for more than a decade. There were so many conflicts of interests in his ACP organization that it couldn’t continue. Even Azmaiparashvili become a reviled figure in Georgia when he served as President. Lautier’s Association for Chess Professionals has been labeled “ineffective” by most who follow chess news.

    I could not imagine Hikaru Nakamura wanting to be a part of any organization for chess (as a politician). I could not imagine Viswanathan Anand being part of that structure either. They are chess players… let them focus on playing chess. We need to hold our leaders accountable and not be afraid of impeaching leaders who are not functioning.

  56. Well Daaim ,I am for player power anytime ,the destiny is always in your hands that way ,seems we will never agree on this .

  57. No… we agree. Read my comments again. Player’s destiny should be in his own hands… my sentiments exactly. However, let me make an amendment. If players have a functioning federation, then they should allow it to lobby for them. China does this for their players and India does this through corporate support. Both have become chess powers in less than 20 years time. Egypt supports their players and has results to show for it. There are different models. For poorly-run federations, players have to take matters into their own hands. That’s what I’ve seen.

    Maurice Ashley struggled and got his GM title without any support. His support was from the community… same with other players like Jesse Kraai. In the U.S., the only support you can get is through the privately-funded Samford Fellowship which is a scholarship for a promising young player worth $30,000. I think IM Ray Robson just won it… deservingly so. However, 99.9% of the players are on their own.

    If Amon Simutowe had sat at home and complained about his conditions to the ZCF he would still be looking for his 3rd norm.

  58. Here are the plus scores after five rounds…

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    IM Khaled Abdel-Razik
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2462
    4
    GM Essam El-Gindy
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2501
    IM Imed Abdelnabbi
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2452
    IM Mohamed Ezat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2459
    GM Ahmed Adly
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2548
    GM Bassem Amin
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2551
    IM Walaa Sarwat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2390
    GM Slim Belkhodja
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2467
    IM Kenny Solomon
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2351
    3
    GM Amon Simutowe
    Zambia
    Zambia
    2481
    3
    IM Watu Kobese
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2391
    3
    IM Mohamed Haddouche
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2329
    3
    GM Aimen Rizouk
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2506
    3
    FM Kamel Njili
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2318
    3
    CM Amir Zaibi
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2123
    3

    Here are the plus scores in the women’s section…

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    WIM Anzel Solomons
    South Africa
    South Africa
    1932
    WFM Sabrina Latreche
    Algeria
    Algeria
    1964
    WGM Mona Khaled
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2094
    WIM Melissa Greef
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2038
    WIM Yosra Alaa el-Din
    Egypt
    Egypt
    1913
    3
    WCM Karima Beddar
    Algeria
    Algeria
    1803
    3
    WIM Amina Mezioud
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2035
    3

  59. Hello Darren
    The Jamaican model is an Ideal model that clearly seems to work for them but is impractical as a template or permanent solution for other instances. I believe Daaim’s essays postulates closest what I might concur with. Unfortunately, in my opinion FIDE to some extent, is the main problem. Many African Federation leaders are ONLY needed for elections. For this, they are rewarded financially, given status and some unprocedurally awarded Grandmaster title for their players simply to ganner votes that maintain the status quo. I still want someone in Botswana to tell me how the WGM tittle was earned as it serves only to insult that country!
    Take another instance why I believe Farai mandizha may have been IM today; the Zimbabwe Fed President who plays chess at every chance he gets ahead of genuine players, frantically made means that no player represented Zimbabwe even after the player travelled to a Junior Championship in Zambia, at his own cost and sacrifice ready to win it. You would hope the FIDE official at the venue (Mr. Ncube: The organiser then!) would let the young man play? Not a damn! Instead he barred Farai Mandizha. Mr. Ncube did not want to upset the vote from Zimbabwe to become VICE PRESIDENT of FIDE, and the Zimbabwe incumbent is still the ‘untouchable’ PRESIDENT!
    So we must deal with the root causes and not the symptoms, if we are to eradicate mismanagement and prosper chess.
    On the Championship matter, Daaim, I respectfully differ with you. I think the Egyptians will dominate top places this time. Not only are they very strong and prepared. Plus they play high level chess consistently. They even contrbersially can play the card up their sleave! You know, the one Fischer accused Russians of playing. Afterall GM. Adley has already being slated as a qualifier. I however hope they keep their good chess integrity and win fair and square. But with so many draws, who is to say the CARD is not already in Play?

  60. Its very unfortunate that individual talents are being trumped by unprofessional management. Its high time we got the people with the right mentality to lead our federations. Zambia has massive talent when it comes to Chess and fielding 1 player at a tournament of such magnitude is detrimental to current and future success. Egypt is a power house and we need our federations to learn how affairs are handled by the Egyptian Federation. It is suffice to note that every tournament has its own lessons and this is a time for both players and federation personnel to learn from the experiences at hand. Chess lovers, lets embrace this beautiful game by ensuring that we task our federation and it all starts by ushering in people who have a vision to improve chess and a strategy on how that is to be achieved and these should be measurable. FIDE may have its own issues but lets clean our own houses (federations) first before we can pounce on them. Lets not make chess positions political, chess is such a beautiful game and a marval to watch.
    I agree with Jackie when he says that the Egyptians will dominate owing to the many players they have fielded and the fact that they are already leading after 5 rounds.

  61. IM Kenny Solomon (website)

    Interesting to read of the “Toiletgate” controversy at Kenny Solomon’s blog… shades of Kramnik and Topalov, 2006. His brother Maxwell Solomon writes of a 2nd round incident between IM Watu Kobese and GM Ahmed Adly. Sounds a bit strange. Does anyone else have anothe account of this? First Maxwell relates to the original “Toiletgate” controversy and then gives the following account:

    Fast forward to the top-of-the-table clash between IM Watu Kobese and GM Ahmed Adly in round 2 of this year’s African Individual Chess Championship in Libya. In the opening IM Kobese gained a clear advantage based on some excellent home preparation. During the course of the game and after having made his move IM Kobese proceeded to walk to the toilet. However, before Watu had exited the playing hall, GM Adly made his move. GM Adly then drew the attention of the arbiter, complaining that IM Kobese was going to the toilet whilst it is his turn to move. In the toilet itself, IM Kobese was surprised to find 5 Egyptians and arbiters blocking his way. After having protested his innocence, IM Kobese returned to the board. He immediately blundered in an almost winning position. IM Kobese’s game with GM Adly eventually petered out to a draw.

    Source: https://kennysolomon.co.za/2009/07/the-2009-african-individual-championship-rounds-1-and-2-toilet-gate-revisited/

  62. Things get a bit more interesting. I have been informed by two sources that mention has been made of the Egyptians drawing each other quickly. There is a 30-move “no-draw” rule in place. Sources report at least one player making a complaint.

    In my view, that strategy can only work if non-Egyptian players continue to draw, but that will not continue to happen. If Belkhodja (TUN) beats Abdelnabbi (EGY), it changes things since the Tunisian would be tied in the lead and Abdel-Razik will probably get another Egyptian. Drawing will no longer be helpful.

    While the Rizouk-Kobese pairing helps the Egyptians, Simutowe and Solomon will be trying to win. Thus, round #8 will be the key round. The rule that players from the same federation cannot face each other in round #9 is quite revealing and may make for some strange pairings.

  63. The rule about players of the same federation not being paired against each other in the last round is also being used in 3.3 zonal that is also being played this moment.

  64. ROUND #6

    The Race Tightens in Open Section

    Despite concerns that the Egyptians contingent would attempt to secure the top positions by cooperatively drawing each other, that is not what happened in round #6. Six Egyptians played on the top three boards. With decisive games on boards #2 and #3, the tournament just got a bit more interesting.

    While Khaled Abdel Razik maintained a share of 1st by drawing with Essam El-Gindy, both Bassem Amin and Ahmed Adly scored wins over Mohamed Ezat and Walaa Sarwat respectively. Now there is a four-way tie for 1st with Tunisia’s Slim Belkhodja moving into the front with a win over Imed Abdelnabbi. Unfortunately for the sub-Saharan contingent of Simutowe, Kobese and Solomon, they were unable to gain ground, but still remain only one point out of 1st.

    The GMs are now filtering to the top where they belong. All six are now playing on the top four boards for several key GM vs. GM encounters. The top five boards are:

    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 AbdelRazik 2462
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Amin 2551
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2 Adly 2548
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Belkhodja 2467
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    3 El-Gindy 2501
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Rizouk 2506
    Algeria
    Algeria
    4 Simutowe 2481
    Zambia
    Zambia
    VanDenHeever 2254
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    5 Ezat 2459
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Solomon 2351
    S. Africa
    South Africa

    Results (round #6): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=6&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #7): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=7&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    Perhaps Simutowe would like to break his string of draws and put together some decisive games. He will be a heavy favorite to win his game while other boards will be tough struggles. There are an amazing 11 players on 3½-2½ so the last three rounds will be bloody. Tiebreaks are going to make a difference!

    Khaled topples Solomons… 3-way tie for 1st

    In an important showdown, defending champion Mona Khaled defeated Anzel Solomons and now shares the lead along with Melissa Greeff who beat Sabrina Latreche. Solomons had a commanding lead, but has now suffered her first loss and will have to regroup.

    Meanwhile Greeff has won three in a row and has momentum. Boikhutso Mudongo has also won three in a row and is now back in contention… although her tiebreaks are poor. She will get Solomons in round #7.

    Again every game was decisive in this round and the percentage is now 91.67% (44/48) showing that the games are fought to the end. This score appears to be at the expense of the tailenders. This will result in some pairings where players may be as much as two points apart. The top three boards for round #7 are:

    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Mezioud 2035
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Khaled 2094
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2 Beddar 1803
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Greeff 2038
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    3 Solomons 1932
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    Mudongo 1905
    Botswana
    Botswana

    Results (round #6): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=6&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #7): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=7&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

  65. Analysis: I see some interesting prospects for final rounds. If Adly and Amin win today, they will move into the lead and probably play each other… and draw in round #8 (giving 6 points). El-Gindy and Rizouk will draw today. If Simutowe wins his game today (making 4½), he could face either Abdel-Razik, Belkhodja or El-Gindy (would have 4½). Kobese and Sarwat are not out of the picture and may win in round #7 (giving 4½). The last two rounds will be exciting.

    I believe there are some norms at stake too. Kobese has played four GMs and may get one more. This could be a memorable tournament for him. He just won the African Rapid Championship!

  66. LET SEVEN BE THE NEW SIX IN AFRICA, PLEASE!
    Hi Daaim,
    Your analysis is spot-on. Good reporting sir! Still however in my crystal ball I see Four or Five Pharoes making the top six. The question that begs an answer is will ACU add the seventh player by virtue of GM. Adley making six! Let’s not leave this to chance or too late!It may help ease tensions in Tripoli!

  67. Jackie,

    I forgot to mention something. Remember when FIDE only accepted five from the 2005 African Championship because Hichem Hamdouchi had already qualified in another zone? I wonder if they will only take the top five. This is something we should think about and lobby for taking six.

    See the report I filed:

    https://www.thechessdrum.net/newsbriefs/2005/NB_AfricanCh5.html

    Adly’s World Junior should NOT count… that is a separate qualification slot. I don’t believe past Junior Champions were counted and that is very easy to determine.

  68. I have been assured that Africa will have six from this tournament. So we should factor Adly out of the qualification race since he has already qualified. The African officials have to make sure this is clear so when they send in the report, FIDE will know. Adly merely serves as the “spoiler” who can make things very tough for the other six aspirants.

  69. I totally agree. The key phrase is “African officials have to make sure!”Not like they cocked it up in Zambia, but rather like they got it right in Namibia! Re spoiler Adley, I was kinda hoping that he entered to try notch-up the crown as part of his already impressive CV. I am happy with his determination, which clearly includes blasting his own countrymen nontheless! The leader-board has shed the all Egypt look. However my crystal ball shows at least four out of Six as Egyptian best. Rules of this event suggest in their design, aspertions and suspetions about players throwing games. I have a problem with this approach. In any case we are heading for drama from the penultimate round. Mark my words!

  70. ROUND #7

    Egyptians Adly and Bassem co-leaders

    As predicted, the two GMs from the “Land of Kings” won their games setting up a match of the tournament’s two top players and brightest talents on the continent. While it is safe to say that Ahmed Adly and Bassem Amin will probably call a truce in their round eight encounter, the events of round seven makes the race so tight that even a draw can hurt one’s chances.

    There are an amazing seven players clustered at 4½ points with six Egyptians in the top 10. The one helpful factor is that Adly has already qualified so the next six will also make the World Cup. Kenny Solomon jumped into contention with a win over Mohamed Ezat and will get the white pieces against Essam El-Gindy in the penultimate round. Solomon is just as comfortable with the black pieces as with white and this will bode well for him in the final round if he should beat El-Gindy.

    Watu Kobese beat Tunisia’s Kamel Njili after celebrating his win in the African Rapid Championship. As expected, Aimen Rizouk and El-Gindy played to a draw and Simutowe toppled Donovan van den Heever. Simutowe will get his nemesis in Khaled Abdel-Razik who defeated him in the playoffs for a spot to the 2007 World Cup. The “Zambezi Shark” will look to exact revenge and play either Adly or Amin in round nine.

    The die is being cast, the nine players with plus score are gearing up for a tense two rounds. In order to make the playoffs, it appears that 6½-2½ would guarantee a chance at making one of the six slots. Following are the plus scores:

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    GM Ahmed Adly
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2548
    GM Bassem Amin
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2551
    IM Khaled Abdel Razik
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2462
    GM Essam El-Gindy
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2501
    IM Kenny Solomon
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2351
    IM Walaa Sarwat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2390
    GM Amon Simutowe
    Zambia
    Zambia
    2481
    IM Watu Kobese
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2391
    GM Slim Belkhodja
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2467

    Thus, the top five boards are:

    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Amin 2551
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Adly 2548
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2 Solomon 2351
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    El-Gindy 2501
    Egypt
    Egypt
    3 Simutowe 2481
    Zambia
    Zambia
    AbdelRazik 2462
    Egypt
    Egypt
    4 Sarwat 2390
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Belkhodja 2467
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    5 Haddouche 2329
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Kobese 2391
    S. Africa
    South Africa

    Results (round #7): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=7&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #8): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=8&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    Mezioud shocks Khaled, Solomons back into lead!

    The women’s section of the 2009 African Championship has to be one of the bloodiest tournaments of recent history. With 5/8 games decisive, the lead has changed hands again and Algeria’s Amina Mezioud chased the defending champion Mona Khaled from the lead allowing Anzel Solomons to reclaim first place on 5½/7.

    This makes things interesting because a draw between Melissa Greeff and Karima Beddar put the South African in joint 2nd with Mezioud on 5/7. Sabrina Latreche follows with 4½ points along with Khaled and Beddar. Now the pairing will become irregular as Solomons get Mezioud and Greeff gets Yosra Alaa el Din who only has 3½. The last round may be similarly irregular.

    The top four boards for round #8 are:

    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Mezioud 2035
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Solomons 1932
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    2 Greeff 2038
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    Alaa el-Din 1913
    Egypt
    Egypt
    3 Latreche 1932
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Beddar 1803
    Algeria
    Algeria
    4 Elansary 1757
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Khaled 2094
    Egypt
    Egypt

    Results (round #7): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=7&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #8): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=8&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

  71. Jackie,

    I’ll say that at least one Egyptian will qualify and I’m not counting Adly. I believe Amin will certainly go. I don’t see Egypt getting 4/6. Adly and Amin will draw in round eight. Abdel-Razik may lose to Simutowe who will be determined to win. You remember Simutowe lost tragically to the Egyptian in 2007 playoffs. Solomon and El-Gindy will probably draw. Belkhodja will win as will Kobese.

    After eight rounds, Adly and Amin will have 6/8 and Simutowe, Belkhodja and Kobese will have 5½/8. Solomon, El-Gindy and Rizouk will have 5/8. That means in the last round, Simutowe may get Adly and Belkhodja may get Amin. Kobese will get El-Gindy.

    It’s going to be a tense last round and a playoff will occur!

  72. Shabazz,
    I like the confidence you have in ‘the zambezi shark’. I am actually a Big fan of his. I really dont think he is going to outwit Abdel-Raziz, my prediction is that they will draw. What are your predictions for the final round after Simutowe’s 8th round draw?

  73. Hi Daaim,I must admit your analysis is convincing! I concede. I want to say though that one cog in your prediction will send more Egyptians to the world cup. I was at table-side in Nam when Simutowe, in a seemingly winning end-game, fell asleep behind the wheel so to speak and was awoken by a soft gentle whisper of “Flag!” by a delighted Abdel.
    Here is my revised prediction: Top Six; Amin,Kobese,Elgindy,Belkhodja,AbdelRazik, Last spot Simutowe or Solomon! (;-)

  74. Lwenyeka,

    Well… I like the way Abdel-Razik has played this tournament, but I believe Simutowe will be extra motivated. He also lost to the Egyptian in the Rapids.

    If Adly and Amin draw, Belkhodja beats Sarwat and Simutowe beats Abdel-Razik, Simutowe will probably get Adly and I’m thinking a draw will happen. Adly will play 100 moves to try to beat him… to help his fellow Egyptians. He has nothing to lose.

    Amin may go for the win against Belkhodja, but it may be too much to risk. If Amin loses then he may have to play a playoff where anything can happen. Amin is strong in rapid, but he would not want to pin his hopes on this.

    If Simutowe and Abdel-Razik draw there may be a massive tie on 5/8 and he’ll get either Rizouk or El-Gindy, a tough assignment.

    The most interesting scenario is if Amin beats Adly, he will clinch a tie for 1st in the tournament. Adly would then go down and serve as “spoiler” to beat a non-Egyptian in round nine. This may make way for another Egyptian, but the chances are about equal whether Adly-Amin is a draw or decisive. The key is that Adly has already qualified and can take risks the other cannot.

  75. Daaim Shabazz,
    I am answering here, because somehow I can’t seem to post a comment in the “African Champs heats up” post.

    I was refering to chess-results site. Until yesterday/today there were no glags displayed. Whoever uplods the results must have added this.

    I also wasn’t refering to your reports. They are great and without this site we would be completely in the dark. You are doing a fantastic job.
    My (rhetorical) question was whether this “taking up the shape” (results coming regulary, adding of flags) means that we will get a report from Libya , and maybe even see some games, before the conclusion of the tournament.

  76. I hope we get reports, but I doubt if it is forthcoming. There may be a final report. My question is… why aren’t officials from the other African federations writing anything or taking photos? They should be reporting on their own players at least. This is why we cannot draw sponsors in Africa… little documentation of events. What is their to show to sponsors as evidence of participation? Abysmal.

    Photos are easier to manage and I was told that the player from the Ivory Coast has taken some. Games may come later, if at all. I have not seen one game from the championships and there is no other proof that the games are being played. The only way games will come is if players send them or post them here.

    P.S. There are still no flags for the women.

  77. yes indeed, we heading for a last round thriller!
    If Pro beats Rizouk in rd 8 he will win his last game for a 6/9 finish!

  78. Just know now that Amin and El Gindy and Sarwat and Abdelnabi won their games , we see the return of Jackie Crystal !!!

  79. The sum of all the parts indicate that we have to be more proactive as players within our various chess federations in Africa. Most countries will more than likely have a sports body or council that provides a budget assigned to various sports including chess, but like most projects the trail probably ends in someone’s pocket. It is this trend that has to stop. I believe we need the political will of various govt to effect change if we are to make progress. This is within the context of the struggle acquiring private sponsorship.

    First step – I charge each and every single body managing chess in their respective African countries to do some fact finding within their National sports organizations. There is a budget for football, tennis, hockey, cricket, athletics and I dare say any sport under the sun, but what happens is those greedy officials look at the more obscure sports where there is hardly any interest and line their pockets. So its up to us who have the interest of the sport at heart to find the time and dedication to follow the trail, within our national sports organizations.

    Once we have done this basic and I must say very hard task then we can begin to prevail. The key is not to let up but to persist because one is not going to stop the flow of this money getting into those pockets without a sweat. Then we can start talking!

  80. Thanks Hassan!

    The Egyptians have prepared this round well.

    So you didn’t mention Abdel-Razik, Simutowe must’ve won? How did Kobese do?

    So far Amin is on 6½ and has clinched a tie for first. Several players are on 5½ including Adly, El-Gindy and Sarawat… all of Egypt. Still waiting on word about Simutowe and Kobese. If they won, they have 5½ and Simutowe will get Adly and Kobese will get Amin. The other Egyptians will be paired down, but Aimen Rizouk can still make the cut. Solomon and Belkhodja are out.

    There will be some strange pairings given that Egyptians cannot be paired. This is definitely to their advantage!

  81. Neville,

    I agree, but it’s very hard if you don’t provide the public with any publicity of the sport you are trying to champion. That’s the reason other sports get funding and chess doesn’t. We don’t show the passion in making the game known. Look at this page. No pictures! No games! No reports from Tripoli!

  82. OK…the suspense is over. Egypt has won all the key matches… amazing!!! Their position is strong now, but several players still have a chance. Report coming.

  83. Amin Bassem is already in World Cup.
    It looks like at least 4 Egyptian (not counting Adly who is already qualified) will qualify, but it could also be 6/6 for pharaons.

  84. This will be extarordinary if Egypt takes all six spots…. and a lesson for sub saharan Africa to take notes..

  85. ROUND #8

    Egyptians storm field… Amin qualifies!

    In perhaps an unprecedented display of domination in a continental championship, the Egyptian delegation put together an impressive display of preparation in round eight to score 8½/10. The only loss was Ahmed Adly’s loss against his compatriot Bassem Amin.

    With his win, Amin clinched a tie for first and also a spot in the 2009 World Cup tournament. The path of destruction that the Egyptians left puts the delegation in a position to claim multiple spots to the World Cup. However, since Egyptians will be playing non-Egyptians fate can also turn against them if they have a letdown.

    Abdel-Razik has played impressive chess the whole way and is perhaps vying for a GM norm (2568 TPR). This display of domination shows that the Egyptians had superb preparation and it certainly bore fruit. The chemistry of the delegation seems to be that of cooperation to meet a favorable end… to get as many Egyptians to the World Cup as possible.

    Here are the plus scores:

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    GM Bassem Amin
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2551
    IM Khaled Abdel Razik
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2462
    GM Ahmed Adly
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2548
    GM Essam El-Gindy
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2501
    IM Walaa Sarwat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2390
    IM Mohamed Haddouche
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2329
    5
    IM Aimen Rizouk
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2506
    5
    IM Imed Abdelnabbi
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2452
    IM Mohamed Ezat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2459
    IM Kenny Solomon
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2351
    GM Amon Simutowe
    Zambia
    Zambia
    2481
    IM Watu Kobese
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2391
    GM Slim Belkhodja
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2467
    Mahmoud El-Kamel Adel
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2239
    Nehad Nyazi
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2237

    The top five matchups for the last round of the 2009 African Championships are:

    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Rizouk 2506
    Algeria
    Algeria
    Amin 2551
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2 Adly 2548
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Haddouche 2329
    Algeria
    Algeria
    3 El-Gindy 2501
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Simutowe 2481
    Zambia
    Zambia
    4 Abdel-Razik 2462
    Egypt
    Egypt
    El-Kamel 2239
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    5 Kobese 2391
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    Sarwat 2390
    Egypt
    Egypt

    So tomorrow brings the tournament to an end. Will the Egyptians offer draws on the top five boards? Amin and Adly may play the games out since neither have anything to lose. A win by either would improve chances for Egyptians lower in the standings. If any Egyptian draws on boards 3-5, they will clinch a spot with 6/9. If an Egyptian loses on boards 3-5, then it gets very interesting. It would then go to the Bucholz score to determine the next four qualifiers in the massive field of 5½/9. The next two will vie in a playoff for the last spot.

    Results (round #8): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=8&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #9): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=9&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    South Africa still leads!

    A South African is in the lead and its not Anzel Solomons this time. Melissa Greeff beat Yosra Alaa el-Din and bolted into joint 1st with Amina Mezioud who was also victorious. Greeff has beaten Mezioud so the tiebreaks may favor her.

    In round eight, each game was decisive and the percentage now moves up to a baudy 89% (57/64). The title is still in doubt as both Greeff and Mezioud (6/8) only have a ½-point lead over three competitors… Mona Khaled, Anzel Solomons and Sabrina Latreche.

    Here are the plus scores in the women’s field:

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    WIM Melissa Greef
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2038
    6
    WIM Amina Mezioud
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2035
    6
    WGM Mona Khaled
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2094
    WIM Anzel Solomons
    South Africa
    South Africa
    1932
    WFM Sabrina Latreche
    Algeria
    Algeria
    1964

    The top players have basically been hammering each other the entire tournament. There hasn’t been a clear favorite, but Greeff has been the steadiest. In the final round, the players on the top six of eight boards are at least 1½-points apart. Given the decisive nature of the games, there may be an upset in the making. Following is the top five boards for the 2009 African Women’s Championships!

    # Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    Player ELO
    Nation
    Flag
    1 Abdulgader 0
    Libya
    Libya
    Greeff 2038
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    2 Rahal 0
    Libya
    Libya
    Mezioud 2035
    Algeria
    Algeria
    3 Khaled 2094
    Egypt
    Egypt
    Mudongo 1905
    Botswana
    Botswana
    4 Elfelo 0
    Libya
    Libya
    Latreche 1964
    Algeria
    Algeria
    5 Solomons 1932
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    Elgohary 1683
    Egypt
    Egypt

    Results (round #8): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=8&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Pairings (round #9): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=9&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

  86. I TOLD YOU SO!!!!
    It pains me to say I was right. Being correct speaks of the frustration I suffer knowing some outcomes before they happen!! Am I a prophet or a sanusi? NO! It was easy to have figured this out. The ubiquitous Chess-Results site we are glued to for info shows how good the Egyptian chess fraternity is kept busy. Following their games and contrasting them with our other top players using Deep Rybka3, you’ll immediately realise how deep in trouble less active players like Kobese will be against them. Plus I am privy to the fact that some of their players sacrificed a lot to prepare!As for our newest GM. Simutowe, his preparation was perhaps not the best for obvious reasons. I witnessed in Angola at first-hand how he easily got rattled by side-shows! He would need to abundon the ‘Rambo’ approach and lean on some assistance. Not so much chess-wise (he has amazing talent!), but basically to aliviate with the errand business of Bookings, Confirming, Negotiating, and several obvious stuffs. I intimated this to him. He needs a MANAGER desperately so he can give us 100% pure chess effort! Believe me this man can be +2600 with little effort! So as well many others I personally know!
    I want to reiterate that as an African I am proud of the Egyptians! Credit must go to chess impressarios like Mr. Hassan Khaled who tirelessly and unselfishly work for the interest of the sport and those who play it! As for Africa at large, let this be a lesson, get your federations in order! Egyptians are Hard-workers thus they deserve the glory! My prediction revisited : Minimum FOUR Egyptians or even a white-wash is possible!

  87. Jackie,

    You’re on the mark, but there is one more round to go and there are many possibilities still at hand. If Egyptians lose a few games then it changes the entire scenario. El-Gindy, Sarwat and Abdel-Razik stand a good chance to qualify, but if any of them lose, then they will have to rely on tiebreaks. Abdel-Razik has strong tiebreaks and will probably make the cut whether he loses or not. However, he may have a GM norm on the line.

    Yes… the Egyptians deserve their success and they are improving rapidly. I look forward to seeing Adly and Amin in the World Cup!

    In the meantime, we’re in for a tense finale!

  88. You becha! Thanks! I must thank you for the work you put in to serve chess with this site. The chess drum has qualified to go to Russia (:-)

  89. Shabazz,

    It pains me more than it pains you that ‘The Zambezi Shark’ failed to swim in Egyptian ‘waters’ yet again! I am a Zambian by the way and believe me you-even the little sanity we had in our chess federation is gone! These days its very hard to find a chess tourney in my country and many of us are opting to just concentrate on our careers. There is enough chess talent in Zambia to dominate the entire continet but our federation is to a large extent non-existent! If players qualify to represent the country, they end up frustrated because more often than not-the money is not available at the time of the trips. I think its high time we the chess players started running chess affairs (i dont know who will be playing then). Hard luck-Amon (change your citizenship if you can!)

  90. Re: He needs a MANAGER desperately so he can give us 100% pure chess effort! Believe me this man can be +2600 with little effort! So as well many others I personally know!

    Jackie, why don’t you become Amon’s Manager. I am sure you have the negotiating and organizing skills necesarry to do this job?

  91. Thanks Jackie for your nice words, thanks Shabazz for your great efforts , Bassem Amin just won his game after less than one hour from the start of Round 9, he is the Champion , and Khaled Abdel Razik Draw his game , I have also the first 8 games of Khaled , and I will email it to you .
    Our players Just finished a tournament in Cairo on 16 July , all was egyptians ( link for its results and games https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23612.aspx?lan=1 ), its main purpose was for prepartion for African Ch, it was Top 10 ( and its prices was 5 prices 1000 – 800 – 600 – 400 – 200 $ and also 100 $ for each player as a pocket Money and full accommodation for all , but there was 2 from our top joined our Youth players as coaches in both Syria ( Abdelnabi in Arab Youth ) and in South Africa ( Sarwat in African Youth ) and Abdel Razik played in Yemen Open ( https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23506.aspx?lan=1 ) also 2 working abroad ( El Taher , and Shoker )

  92. At the end of “African Champs heats up”
    https://www.thechessdrum.net/blog/2009/07/25/2009-african-champs-heat-up/
    it is written:

    “First, the tiebreak system will use Bucholz. The twist is that for a massive 1st-place tie, the top five highest Bucholz scores will qualify and the others will play a playoff for the one last spot.”

    But is that really the case? It would be logical if all players with the same ammount of points play-off.

    However in the official invitation
    https://www.thechessdrum.net/tournaments/AfricanCh2009/2009AfricanChampionship.pdf

    under number 8. it says that

    “…if there is a tie for the medal winners and/or the
    qualifiers for the World Cup, these ties will be resolved in the
    following order; by the results between the players involved in the tie, Sum of Progressive Score, failing that Buchholz, failing that
    Sonneborn-Berger, failing that number of won games.

    In the event of the foregoing tiebreak system being inconclusive, tie break matches will be used as a final resort.”

    So tie-break matches will only be played if all previous criteria don’t establish the best six.

    First criterion is the direct results between the players involving in a tie!

  93. i AGREE WITH Number 107

    I’m Zambian as well, and i went to the same secondary school as Amon in Ndola. And yes, it’s hard to find a good tourney that attracts top players. I played in a tourney some weeks ago,(after some years, and this was a really small tourney sponsored by an individual) and the reason why i only played 4 out of nine rounds was simple. I was busy with my own life of making money and working!

    Our federation is a problem on it’s own, and to some extent, most of our players still need more tounaments for exposure and learn new ideas!

    and Jackie raises a very important aspect about Amon (like Jackie knows amon himself deeply). It’s true, Amon likes the RAMBO approach to things…i will tell you one thing, he isn’t so popular amongst other chess players here in Zambia, but thats a different debate anyway…

    Anyway, all the best Amon, i know El Gindy ain’t easy meat, but just go for it…!

    My prediction, El Gindy gets Amon …….. AGAIN!!

    Where can i find these games anyway…??

  94. @nevermind,

    I think it’s strange as well and maybe I received the wrong interpretation. For example, if there is a six-way tie for 2nd place, the next four players will be determined using the tiebreak system and the last two will play a blitz playoff. That’s the way it was described to me. It would be best for all with the same score to have an all-play-all playoff.

    @Lwenyeka,

    If you can tell what he would change to then we can have a debate, but to say “change it” is not helpful. I don’t believe it is a good idea. What Zambia needs to do is get people in positions that serve the players. From what you are saying, all the players are suffering and are focusing on other endeavors. It seems easier to get a new slate than for all players to move abroad and hope their new country will sponsor them (which certainly will not happen… at least not in the U.S.). I was disheartened that Stanley Chumfwa has stopped competing. Most chess federations (including the U.S. where I am) do a poor job of marketing chess events and that does not help sponsorship. Hikaru Nakamura is poised in the top 20 and gets no assistance from the USCF.

    @Logan,

    Yes… Amon has a progressive approach and I’ve discussed many approaches with him. I will tell you this… if he had not taken the initiative that he has, he WOULD NOT be a Grandmaster today. In fact, he may have simply given up.

  95. Why are some people seemingly hating on Egyptians? Who the cap fit,let them wear it!!Its not a secret Bassem is strongest African player in this day excluding Hamdouchi.And as I rightly predicted,he is winning this.

  96. Darren,

    Yes… Bassem won. I don’t remember you mentioning your prediction here on the blog. If you did, that’s great, but of course Egyptians are by far the strongest federation. Everyone knows this already. The main question is how many they will send to Russia. So far it’s three (two from this tournament pending final results).

  97. Replying 108 Leonard;
    I recently had fruitful discussion with him about the Management issue. I am more interested in holistic/ broader approach to at least solve the problem eternally. That indeed will involve Amon! Let’s hold thumbs.
    Posting 111, the relationship regarding other Zambian players should not bother you. In fact you will be suprised that ZCF is responsible for the bad-blood as they always pretended that they all the money went to Amon’s success. at least that’s what I had to perry out of the mentality of less talented players.
    General advice to all is, just as Amon made it by lifting himself on his own boots straps, so can you in organising small events to highlight the chess setback in Zambia. Rightfully, where would he be if he waited for help? Do something! You have the power!

  98. HI EVERYONE!
    Please read Thread 109 by Hassan! This is serious privy! The Egyptians have given their players a huge boost in preparing for this event. So, you wanna begrudge them? I know Amon was being sent pillar-to-post by officials in Zambia with false promises! This at the eve of this major event nogal!.
    I am proud of his efforts even more especially when I know that the playing field was not level! He won the touney in Angola, Luanda; He won the SA Open with seasoned GM s at play; OK, if he does not make top six, so what? He is billed as a deserving Star in Norway starting within two days. Don’t cry for him! He is looking good regardsless!

  99. Why are some people mixing up Zimbabwe Chess Federation ,ZCF with Chess Federation of Zambia CFZ ??

  100. Last news , Bassem Only draw at morning , also Khaled and Adly , So 1st Bassem then Khaled – Then Adly then El Gindy , then Sarwat and 6th. Ezat all qualified , and waiting for Tie break match between Algerian Rizouk and Haddouche for 7th place . ( they aksed to let Ezat join them in Tiebreak Matches , But Nizar told them that Tiebreak rules apply only for last needed place )
    Also for Women Melissa and Mezioud qualified , and waiting for tiebreak matches ( winner of Solomons and Latreche ) against Mona.
    Also There were Blitz African Ch. on restday on Sunday , won by Adly 2nd Khaled then Amon , Then Mohamed, Farag (EGY) then Ezat

  101. Hassan,

    Thanks! So five Egyptians qualify in this tournament. That is still excellent for their federation. Jackie “crystal ball” Ngubeni came through. It was an example of good preparation.

    The tiebreak is strange. You would think that they would include everyone with the same scores, but they only take the last two for the final spot. This is what I was explaining to “nevermind”.

    It’s a shame that there are no pictures. Whoever hosts the Championships in 2011, they should have the media coverage worked out. The fact that no stories were available to the public was a travesty. Officials from other African federations didn’t post any stories either.

  102. Bassem Amin is the 2009 African Champion!!

    Bassem Amin drew his last match with Aimen Rizouk and qualified for the World Cup to take place in Russia. He will be joined by GM Ahmed Adly (who already qualified), IM Khaled Abdel-Rizouk, IM Essam El-Gindy, IM Walaa Sarwat and IM Mohamed Ezat. Rizouk will face Mohamed Haddouche for the final spot.

    Melissa Greeff tops Women’s Field!!

    Full report coming!

  103. The tiebreak is strange. You would think that they would include everyone with the same scores, but they only take the last two for the final spot.

    Not only is it strange, it was not what was writen in regulations. I have no idea how could one interpretate this from the regulations. The tie-break criteria is clearly listed in order they should be used and the last paragraph clearly states:

    “In the event of the foregoing tiebreak system being inconclusive, tie break matches will be used as a final resort.”

  104. You read Hassan’s comment 119, right?

    …waiting for Tie break match between Algerian Rizouk and Haddouche for 7th place . ( they aksed to let Ezat join them in Tiebreak Matches , But Nizar told them that Tiebreak rules apply only for last needed place )

    Rizouk and Haddouche didn’t have the same exact tiebreaks in all those categories (look at tables). I was told they had a meeting and there were some rules agreed upon including the 30-move “no-draw” rule. I’m not certain if the tiebreak was one of the rules agreed upon, but what Hassan described differs from the regulations.

    Maybe the operative word is “inconclusive” could mean the scores are close but not exact. Nevertheless there is a match and it follows the method that was given to me by a player who is in Libya (since Ezat was not allowed).

  105. So five Egyptians qualify to represent Africa, big deal. We can, “We should” all learn a good deal from this experience. They went into this full force. Administrators doing what they are suppose to do and players, well Players focusing on the 32 pieces doing battle on the 64 squares and getting the points.

    We can point fingers as much as we want but until we remove the stumbling blogs in the way of efficient progress, we will always be in this situation and being disappointed.

    1) The mother body on the continent “Africa”, it’s failing.
    2) My own CHESSA, it’s failing (So as ZCF, CZF etc.).
    3) People like me, we are failing our own undeveloped young talent. Who can blame us? Nobody can because we are working very hard for our families. Wait, History will judge us very harshly as we chose not to stand up and be counted. We keep on not getting our little resources together and acting accordingly. We are always the victims, the ones who must get handouts, the ones who need to be rescued. That’s old, we need to get whatever little we have, and move on it.

    Comment #107 & #111, for the Shark to change Federations, it’s not the answer. We the people on the ground with all the power in the world are the answer. Our Federations are misusing Government grants (regardless how small), we need to bring them down. Our fathers struggled to free us from the white oppressors. They too had families to take care of, but still stood up and were counted. We need not use guns, just a little creativity and you‘ll.
    I do not have all the answers and I am sure it’s not gonna happen tomorrow, but that shouldn’t stop us from taking the first step.
    ”but”, # 109Hassan Khaled has given us a small hint of what it takes to have your country men dominate a Continent.

    tebatso.

  106. Wondering if the organizers will put up the scores of the 9th round. This is one of the most common oversights in tournaments. There is usually such a pre-occupation with closing the tournament that this detail gets missed.

    We know that there were draws on the top five boards and Mohamed Ezat beat Slim Belkhodja.

    Standings
    1st: GM Bassem Amin (EGY), 7-2; 2nd-5th: GM Ahmed Adly (EGY), GM Essam El-Gindy (EGY), IM Khaled Abdel-Razik (EGY), IM Walaa Sarwat (EGY), 6-3; 6th-8th: GM Aimen Rizouk (ALG), IM Mohamed Haddouche (ALG), IM Mohamed Ezat (EGY), 5½-3½

    Who were the norm recipients? Looks like Abdel-Razik and Sarwat got GM norms.

  107. https://mg.chess.org.za/index.htm
    I don’t know who is in charge of CHESSA’s publicity…but on this link of Mid-Gauteng Chess in SA…it has been announced that Melissa Greeff won the Women’s section. I’m just wondering…where is CHESSA..the “Official” website of SA Chess! This is news one should read on CHESSA first!

  108. Mona qualified after 2 Rapid games ( not 4 as in the regulations ) , So I think they agreed in the tecknical meeting the final regulations for the tournament .
    No one got GM norm , so Both Khaled and Walaa made a perfomance less than 2600 , and to get norm you must have Gold medal or perfomance more than 2600 . And note also that this Tournament qualify for men to World Cup not World Ch. and for Women to World Ch.
    Khaled Got 2 GM norm in Dresden Olimpiad and also 2 IM norms ( so he had IM norm before then obtained IM title ) and he sacrified a medal on his board in Dresden ( he was 7 out of 7 ) and still 2 rounds . In Round 10 after my advice played against Mamedov from AZE and played last round also to complete 9 Gmaes which was necessary for Norms

  109. Kgomotso,

    Yes… we talk about these same issues here in the states. Fortunately we have rich talent in the Black community sprouting up. The question I believe you are getting at is “how do you develop it?”

    As far as the whole of Africa, Egypt has proved to be the most expeditious in building their chess program. They also have the benefit of good proximity to strong tournaments and good conditions. No other federation in Africa is close. However, federations like Nigeria and Zambia are brimming with potential, but only had one player each in the tournament. NO EAST AFRICAN NATION PARTICIPATED!!

    I’m not certain what is being done on the mainland continent, but it appears as if each federation is struggling to stay alive. There are many new federations trying to make a start. Lewis Ncube showed me pictures in Dresden. Will these federations last? I’m not sure what the African Union is planning or what the FIDE officials are planning, but there is a lot to learn from this tournament.

  110. Hassan,

    Thanks again! That’s a shame because Khaled was at 2568 after round eight. What was his final performance rating?

    For norm purposes, FIDE raises the two lowest opponent’s ratings to 2250, but that probably wouldn’t help much.

    Where there any norms? IM norms? FM titles?

  111. Thanks to Maxwell Solomon and Jackie Ngubeni who provided coverage on their own blogs. Below is a listing of their stories of Maxwell’s (in reverse order). All of Jackie’s stories can be found at https://www.chessacademy.co.za/

    Maxwell Solomon, “Empire Strikes Back in Round 8” (30 July 2009)

    Maxwell Solomon, “High Drama in Round 7” (29 July 2009)

    Maxwell Solomon, “The Pharoah Kings Lead at African Individual Championship (Rounds 6)” (28 July 2009)

    Maxwell Solomon, “WIM Anzel Solomons strikes at 2009 African Championship (Round 5)” (27 July 2009)

    Maxwell Solomon, “IM Kenny Solomon shares lead at African Individual Championship (Rounds 3 & 4)” (26 July 2009)

    Maxwell Solomon, “ToiletGate Revisited?” (24 July 2009)

    Maxwell Solomon, “A Preview of the 2009 African Individual Championship” (19 July 2009)

  112. Khaled played last round against 2239 , and from 1 July for GM norm Rating raises only for one player to 2200 not 2250 as before , Khaled performance was 2568 after Round 8 , and he also draw only at the last round , so now his performance is 2538 only
    His only chances was to play against Aimen Rizouk 2506 at the last Round instead of El Kamel , and also he need to win , then his performane will be 2602 and get his last GM norm !!!!
    The other variation , he win his last game against anyone, and Bassem loss , Then Khaled will be the Champion with Tiebreak ., and the Gold medal earn GM norm ( if it was qulaification to world Ch. it woill be Full GM title. So congratulation to Mellisa which got WGM Title . I do not know the rest , so full results not clear yet !!!!

  113. Wow!
    This was an Egyptian Chess spectacular show! One that should shame Federations unsupportive of their subjects! Kgomotso hi, good to hear you via this forum. I share your sentiments and lets talk off-air regarding what we can do on the ground! Hassan, thank you for the info flow, please pass my fondest regards to my brothers and congratulate them for me! Like the towering wonders Pyramids are, they have sent a clear message to their motherland and beyond. I am particularly more proud as they were prepared to clobber each other for the sake of fair-play!
    Dr. Amin Bassem, KING of AFRICA, YOU ROCK SON!!!!

  114. We waited 5 days for the first results, maybe we will have to wait 5 days for the final results 😉

  115. Daaim
    Bassem just called me , and I asked him to email me or you with his games and photos today , they will arrive tomorow .
    Final Results on Chess Results from about one hour .

  116. @Hassan,

    That would be great to get Bassem’s games. There are no other games available. Do you also have Khaled’s 9th round game?

    @nevermind,

    As I mentioned, this is a common mistake of organizers. They are intent on packing up and closing the tournament that they do not put up the final results. I have covered so many tournaments (large and small) where this has happened. Of course, it should NOT happen, but it often does. Sometimes the results don’t get updated until days later. However, Hassan has said that the results are coming.

  117. Chess-results has the results from last 9th round now. Tiebreaks wont be shown there. We need someone from Libya to say who has won the tie-break 🙂

  118. When I view the results for the men, it seems that there were entirely too many draws on the top boards given the that the quallification spots were at stake. In contrast, all the women’s games were decisive in the last round. I do not accuse any player of not fighting without knowing more, but this is not the last round result I expected.

    Kimani A. Stancil

  119. Well, on first 5 boards Egyptians only needed a draw and probably played for it from move 1. Mohamed Ezat needed to win and did so. Abdelnabbi and Solomon both needed a win tio have a chance, and probably aldo both tried to, but it ended in a draw.

    So if you take the standings into account, the last round results ARE logical.

  120. ROUND #9

    Five Egyptians Qualify… Bassem Amin is Champion!

    GM Bassem Amin

    GM Bassem Amin, 2009 African Champion

    Wrapping up a successful tournament, there were predictions on who would win the six slot to qualify for the World Cup. The debate centered around whether Egypt would win all six slots. They nearly accomplished this fascinating task and perhaps it is testament to how much they continue to improve.

    Going into the last round, Bassem Amin had already clinched a tie for first. All he needed to do was to earn a draw for clear first. In fact, Egypt was in such a dominate position that draw on boards 1-5 would clinch the overall title and three additional slots. Ahmed Adly had already qualified and he kept his opponent at bay.

    Mohammad Ezat jumped into the fifth qualifying slot with a win over Tunisia’s Slim Belkhodja and thus a playoff for the last slot would be between Aimen Rizouk and Mohamed Haddouche, both of Algeria. This tiebreak system was agreed upon prior to the meeting.

    This tournament must have been a bit disappointing for the strong trio from southern Africa. Amon Simutowe, Watu Kobese and Kenny Solomon came with high hopes and each brought World Cup experiences with them. Unfortunately they were not able to maintain momentum in the second half of tournament and ended on +1.

    IM Kenny Solomon

    IM Kenny Solomon’s website carried round-by-round updates
    by his brother Maxwell Solomon. Visit the site!
    Photo by Daaim Shabazz.

    There were some interesting developments in the tournament including Khaled Abdel-Razik’s strong performance. There was participation by Madagascar’s Alain Ranaivoharisoa who ended with a respectable 4/9. Madagascar is not a known entity and unlike their African island cousins, Seychelles and Mauritius, have not fielded an Olympiad team in recent years.

    There was a brief controversy of “Toiletgate” in the second round between Kobese and Adly. There was a notion that Kobese had gone to the bathroom during his move. It turns out that while Kobese was heading to the bathroom, Adly had made a move. The situation was debated and the game continued. According to sources at the venue, Kobese then let an advantage slip and the game was drawn.

    The Visa Crisis

    There was also a bit of contoversy with the visas as several federations voiced displeasure of the process including receiving invitations after the due date. Nigerians, Ghanaians, Malawians, Angolans, Zimbabweans all experienced trouble with the visa process. Thus, the both the defending champion Robert Gwaze of Zimbabwe and the runner-up Pedro Aderito of Angola missed the tournament. There will have to be improvements in the communication process and as someone suggested, three months in advance for invitations.

    Here are the plus scores (full standings at link below):

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    GM Bassem Amin
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2551
    7
    IM Khaled Abdel Razik
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2462
    6
    GM Ahmed Adly
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2548
    6
    GM Essam El-Gindy
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2501
    6
    IM Walaa Sarwat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2390
    6
    IM Mohamed Ezat
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2459
    IM Mohamed Haddouche
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2329
    IM Aimen Rizouk
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2506
    IM Imed Abdelnabbi
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2452
    5
    IM Kenny Solomon
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2351
    5
    GM Amon Simutowe
    Zambia
    Zambia
    2481
    5
    IM Watu Kobese
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2391
    5
    CM Amir Zaibi
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2123
    5
    Mahmoud El-Kamel Adel
    Tunisia
    Tunisia
    2239
    5
    CM D. Van Den Heever
    S. Africa
    South Africa
    2254
    5

    Results (round #9): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=2&rd=9&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

    Melissa Greeff wins African Crown!

    Melissa Greeff, 2009 African Women's Champion

    Melissa Greeff, 2009 African Women’s Champion

    It appeared as if South Africa was going to have a good tournament when Mona Khaled suffered an early setback in round two. Anzel Solomons held the lead until losing it in the eight round when her compatriot Melissa Greeff took the baton and won the championship on tiebreaks ahead of Amina Mezioud who upset Khaled in round seven and Solomons in round eight.

    This championship must have set records for the percentage of decisive games and ended on , each game was decisive and the percentage now moves up to a baudy 90.2% (65/72). While Egypt did not show the domination as they did in the men’s section, they got one candidate through to the Women’s World Championship. South Africa had a strong showing with two women in the top five.

    Here are the plus scores in the women’s field (full standings at link below):

    Title Player
    Nation
    Flag
    ELO Pts.
    WIM Melissa Greef
    South Africa
    South Africa
    2038
    7
    WIM Amina Mezioud
    Algeria
    Algeria
    2035
    7
    WGM Mona Khaled
    Egypt
    Egypt
    2094
    WIM Anzel Solomons
    South Africa
    South Africa
    1932
    WFM Sabrina Latreche
    Algeria
    Algeria
    1964
    WCM Karima Beddar
    Algeria
    Algeria
    1803

    Results (round #9): https://www.chess-results.com/tnr23976.aspx?art=2&rd=8&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000
    Standings: https://www.chess-results.com/tnr24026.aspx?art=1&lan=1&m=-1&wi=1000

  121. Kimani,

    “nevermind” is correct. The Egyptians could take draws on the top five boards and clinch the title and several spots. I mentioned these scenarios in my pre-game analysis as well. Given the rule that players of the same federation could not play each other in the last round, this produced unlikely pairing where players were a full point apart. In each case, a draw would render the Egyptians unassailable.

    Hey… what you do you say about the women’s section… 90% decisive results. I wonder if this was merely careless chess, or hard-fought battles. Probably a bit of both. We’ll need to see the games.

  122. The outcome is logical if the better positioned player is necessarily
    considered the stronger player as if they are able to maintain a draw at will and with both colors. My expectation is not based on whether the better positioned player(the Egyptians in this year’s case) can take a draw but is whether the lesser positioned player(all others) should be game enough to take the chances needed to win(and possibly lose). I have not done any of the tie-break calculations, but is it somehow true that if every player who had 4.5 going into Rd. 9 ended at 5.5, then they would still not qualify? Or is it that based on the calculation that early draws influenced later draws in the round? I can also see that it may
    be possible that early draws influence later draws as one may choose(or attempt) to draw later to enhance the qualifying chances of friends that need wins but suffer more if you lose.

  123. Kimani,

    The rule I stated also made a big difference. Not being able to play someone from your own federation in the last round gave Egypt and chance to use a very cogent strategy. In the end, they ended up having strong tiebreaks anyway. However, if Simutowe, Kobese and Solomon had won it would have created a cluster of nine players on 5½-3½! Imagine that!

    Rizouk, Adly, Abdel-Razik, Haddouche, Simutowe, Kobese, Solomon, Sarwat and Ezat (who won) would have had to wait on the tiebreaks. It is my view that at least one of the 4½ may have made the cut and another may have made the playoff for the 6th spot. Adly doesn’t really count because he already qualified. I haven’t talked to any of the players or seen the games, but it would be interesting to actually see the last round games.

  124. Daaim
    Boy O boy! from all the comments it appears this was an exciting championship, but what a shame about publicity from what I gather. I tried to access the live games via World Chess Live but had no response to my requestl. A whole African Chess Championship not broadcast on WCL!! or was it? To put it in perspective I was able to request and watch the Ghanaian matches in Dresden live on WCL. Okay so it was the Olympiad but….

    I think Daim that you are filling a huge gap in the market promoting black and diasporan endeavours in chess. As they say if you dont bigup yourself nobody will, so kudos to a work in progress.

    Is it possible to use your ‘Talking Drum’ to explore this with WCL so that if indeed there was no coverage on their server, come next African Championship we are represented? I will do an email to WCL in the mean time to find some answers.

    The issue of visas simply beats my imagination plus did someone quote $2 G costs for Tripoli? The question remains that if there continue to be impediments to progress in our own backyard how much more Dresden where across the continent we had a number of African teams without their full contingent. I think Egypt have shown us that with good organization and commitment we can go places.

    I guess the best way foward is for Bassem Amin, Melissa Greef and others representing Africa, to make their mark on the global stage and in the process prise open those doors. Our representatives at Fide should be pushing foward the African agenda even harder to create a level playing field where all embassy’s around the world cannot deny a player or a team from our dear continent access. Must look for your interview with Ncube.

  125. Neville,

    You speak the truth. It is a global mindsight we are fighting. It is the “afro-pessimism” that many global citizens are afflicted with and it results in a dismissive attitude of Africa and its descendants. African chess is not covered in the media. We cannot expect ChessBase, Chessvibes, Europe-Echecs or any site to cover African chess more than we are covering it.

    This site is viewed in over 200 countries and territories and after eight years, it has quite a large following. Many do not realize the scope and popularity of this forum. However, is should not be the only vehicle. There has to be a spirit of sharing… games, photos, reports, or news tips. We saw how the coverage in this tournament was lacking.

    There is a voice for the African Disapora… a platform to discuss issues… a platform to share ideas. Let us use it while we can!

  126. Does anyone know anything about the player Degondo from Ivory Coast? The Ivory Coast fielded a team in the Nigerian All-Africa Games in 2003, but not sure if he played. He had a nice win against Paul Obiamiwe.

    Update: I DID mention him in the 2003 All-African Games coverage. He beat IM Eugenio Campos of Angola and Stanley Chumfwa of Zambia. Not sure if he lives in France or how he got to a decent level.

  127. These are few photos out of the many Hassan has sent. Most of there were of Bassem. There will be more coming. If you have any please send them to webmaster@thechessdrum.net.

    Photos from 2009 African Chess Championships

    GM Bassem Amin facing IM Watu Kobese at the 2009 African Championships. IM Walaa Sarwat faces GM Amon Simutowe.

    GM Bassem Amin facing IM Watu Kobese in the 4th round of the 2009 African Championships. IM Walaa Sarwat faces GM Amon Simutowe. The playing area looks comfortable.

    This beautiful banner no doubt gave Amin a lot of motivation.

    Nice Banner!
    This beautiful banner no doubt gave Amin a lot of motivation.

    Trophies and another nice banner.

    Trophies and another nice banner.

    
Bassem Amin receiving his championship award.

    Grand Prize trophies and champion’s certificate

    
Bassem Amin receiving his championship award.

    Bassem Amin receiving his championship award.

  128. Daaim,
    Just wanted to update following my query with World Chess Live for not covering the African Championship.

    Their response ‘some tournaments require huge fees from us in order to show them, so we cannot afford to do it yet. As we grow we will be doing more and more, so if you have a request, by all means suggest it’.

    So there is a window of opportunity for the future if this is not mere lip service and an avenue for the African Chess Federation to persue.

  129. Congratulations to you Mr. Amin on a successful result, and to all the participants it seems you had a wonderful time! The lack of coverage is unfortunate yet expected from theses people, they tried this stuff in basketball and everything else, it wont be long now, but we have to thank you all for being the pioneers! Bless.

  130. Neville,

    Thanks for checking into it. The Internet Chess Club (ICC) will often handle the relay for a limited number of boards. I have used them for a couple of matches and one year for the Barbados Championship. The issue is having someone to do the relay. The thing is to have the DGT boards, but of course that is an expense and it would require a minor wiring miracle. Below is a small bit of the wiring needed for DGT boards at the 2008 Olympiad. 🙂

    Cables to connect DGT boards.

  131. Lionel,

    I’m not sure of “these people” you are referring to, but people who live on the African continent were 100% responsible for 2009 African Championships… for better or for worse.

  132. The reference is to the world of chess who have consistantly made excuses for not giving mother Africa her proper respect ,be it on the continent or someplace else, it is the same old psyche.

  133. Right, it’s a psyche of “afro-pessimism”, but it is a condition that many Black people have internalized as well. Self-respect is important too. We can’t expect anyone to pay attention to African events if we don’t cover them either. Where were the African journalists and webmasters during this tournament?

    China and India chose not to complain about lack of respect in chess twenty years ago… they went out and earned it and are now amongst the strongest federations in the world. They had a plan. Respect is not given… it’s earned! Now if you are among the strongest and still get no respect then that is another matter.

    The Egyptians are definitely earning respect and in that regard, so you’re right… they are pioneers. However, let’s not be upset (or surprised) that the world doesn’t provide Africa and its descendants with any attention in chess. We merely have to be more proactive. If you have enough examples of excellence, people will begin to take notice.

    Hichem Hamdouchi of Morocco is the player from an African country (or of African descent) to make it over 2600 FIDE so far. Amin probably will be the second. We’ve still got plenty of work to do.

  134. Aha! Daaim
    so there is a way foward via DGT boards. I would Like to see this followed through by the next championship. Could you put this foward as an agenda for both African and Caribbean Federations to look at ie to find the money! As you rightly point out we have to force our way into the mainstream, the talents will definitely come through with time.

    The piece on Amon Simutowe is fantastic, I am extremely proud of this guy’s achievement – didn’t come easy. Congratulations Amon!

  135. Brother Shabazz your comments have truly been enlightening and i thank you for them,however, i must add that personal triumphs in eurocentric events is not something that “moves” yours truly, yet rather i am here to see to it that we are given the proper historical respect in our royal game, then i will leave competitive chess as easily as i have come, of course i will win some of their events change the rating they give me, but this doesnt mean too much because the current form of chess is all biased towards WHITE but they are learning different now because of your site in fact, just go to chessgames.com and you will see them playing a bit better with BLACK, but this is just a start for CHANGE. BLESS.

  136. Lionel,

    You certainly have a choice not to play chess under the official rules, but those of us who would like to compete in this format deserve to discuss how we can excel. If you’re not concerned about excelling in this format, then we respect your wishes and your right to excuse yourself from a discussion in which you’re not interested.

    If you believe that changing the game will make a difference in how people of African descent play, then that is a separate issue… and we’ve discussed that before here. However, it is not the form of chess that is important here. What we are discussing is the passion, discipline and determination that will define success in anything we do… that is the lesson in this championship.

  137. Ok thanks for your input i surely need it! hahaha although im not completely sure what your perceving, my chess buddies here in the Buffalo warned me about my atypical ideas!! haha They say im crazy i respond, POSSIBLY! PEACE AND LOVE TO YOU ALL !!

  138. Chess is again part of the All Africa Games 2011
    Tuesday, 22 July 2008 09:47

    The Director General of COJA-Zambia 2011, host of the 10th All Africa Games 2011 to be held in Zambia has confirmed that chess will once again be one of the sports following Nigeria 2003 and Algeria 2007.

    The assistance of FIDE Continental President and African Chess Union President Dabilani Buthali of Gaborone, Botswana was requested to ensure the chess event is organised competently.

    This will be tabled at the coming General Assembley in Dresden, Germany 2008 which is held concurrently with the 38th World Chess Olympiad.

    Source: https://www.fide.com/component/content/article/4-tournaments/3072-chess-is-again-in-all-africa-games-2011

  139. hello , i tell you that mezioud amina and algerian federation lie to tell that mezioud amina is african champion you can see that at algerian site of federation https://www.fade-dz.com/ do something with fide and algerian minister to punish liers .
    thanks

  140. Amina Mezioud tied for 1st, but Melissa Greeff won on tiebreaks. Greeff also defeated Mezioud in their game. It is a mistake. They merely should mention her tie for first and clarify the tiebreak.

    They even mentioned that she won the gold medal. They should change that story immediately. It reads…

    championnat d’Afrique à Tripoli
    Amina Mézioud décroche la médaille d’or!

    La talentueuse joueuse Amina Mezioud confirme une fois de plus les grands espoirs placés en elle en devenant championne d’Afrique devant le gotha des échéphiles du continent dans le très difficile championnat qui s’est tenu à Tripoli du 21 au 30 juillet. Déjà bardée de titre au niveau national et arabe, la talentueuse joueuse native du Vieux Rocher constantinois franchi un nouveau palier très important pour sa progression et sa jeune carrière d’autant que ce championnat d’Afrique est qualificatif pour la coupe du monde qui se tiendra l’année prochaine. Les deux autres joueuses algériennes engagées dans cette compétition n’ont pas déméritées à l’image de Sabrina Latrèche, médaille d’or au récent championnat d’Afrique des des U14 qui a raté sa qualification de justesse au tae break et de Karima Beddar championne d’Algérie 2009 qui a bien débuté son tournoi mais a connu une baisse de forme au finish. Pour l’épreuve masculine de ce championnat, les choses ont été encore plus difficiles pour nos joueurs vu le niveau continental très élevés avec pas moins de 5 GMI (grand maître international) dont l’égyptien Ahmed Adly, champion du monde junior 2009, engagés dans l’épreuve. Le seul GMI algérien Aimen Rizouk a réalisé l’essentiel arrachant sa qualification à la coupe du monde devant « l’armada » égyptienne qui occupe les 6 premières places au tableau final (!) avec le GMI Amin Bassem en tête. Les Egyptiens avec 6 joueurs engagés ont joué ce championnat individuel avec un esprit d’équipe en « combinant » les parties entre eux ce qui a compromis grandement les chances des autres participants et faussé plus ou moins l’épreuve. Ainsi, détenteurs exe quo de la 7 ème place, Aimen Rizouk et son coéquipier Mohamed Haddouche, le champion d’Algérie 2009, ont du tristement avoir recours au tae break pour la dernière place qualificative…

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