Daaim Shabazz

Dr. Daaim Shabazz is the creator and webmaster of The Chess Drum. He serves as a tenured faculty member of Global Business & Marketing at Florida A&M University in Tallahassee, Florida, USA. He holds an MBA in Marketing and a doctorate in International Affairs & Development. He has served the journalist community for more than 30 years and still competes in tournaments occasionally.

2 Comments

  1. Hi Daaim,
    I will try to keep solving these until others get into the mix:
    1…Qf5+ 2. Kxf5 d5(threatening both 3….Ne3 and 3….Nh6 mate)
    Since White has no checks, nor can he eliminate the knight, then
    White will be mated by the knight on Black’s third move from
    the diagramed position above.
    NOTE THE FOLLOWING FANTASY THOUGHT PATTERN THAT MAY HELP OTHERS IN PRACTICAL PLAY: If White were able to
    eliminate the knight on g4, Black would still win on the third move
    since any White piece used to capture the knight would block
    the White king from escaping mate by 3…Bg6.

  2. :mrgreen:

    The zwishenzug 2…d5 is really the beauty!

    There’s a mate in six, but of course we want to mate quickly. Some may have started looking at…

    1…Bg6+ 2. Kf3 Qf5+ 3.Kg3 Qf2+ 4. Kh3 (4.Kxd4 Qg2#) 4… Qh4+ 5.Kg2 Be4+ 6.Kg1 Qf2#

    OK… “mate in threes” are too easy. Back to the “play and win” puzzles. 😉

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